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  1. GuidanceHD
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    #1

    Question The Great Gatsby: A Matter of Style.

    Given that this is for an Academic research paper, would you kindly mark out the better choice of the two provided in red (in literary or stylistic terms). Suggestions other than those mentioned here are most welcome.


    • “Myrtle was killed in cold blood as Daisy and Tom have the money and power necessary to cover them up/ cover up for them

    • Gatsby is murdered "with ease" and (is) gone without the respectable funeral he deserved for “his hospitality” at least.
    Gatsby is murdered with ease and has gone without the respectable funeral he deserved for “his hospitality” at least.
    (May I use “with ease” as a substitute for “in cold blood”? Are there other (literary) alternatives?)


    • Is it acceptable to say: she assumed the role of a lady full well, as analogous to: he knows full well?


    • …characterized not only by moral laxity but also by lack of taste (Is it “more literary” to repeat by?)

    • He was a friend of Daisy’s/Daisy?

    • …regardless of who loves her better/more?

    • …the incidents fire up even more until they are eventually extinguished with Gatsby shot dead/ being shot dead in his pool?

    • The main symbol of the novel is Gatsby, and his greatness is the centre of (the?) dispute.

    • On another occasion (are there other “literary” synonyms?)

    • Any contempt the reader might feel/ have for Tom and Daisy is offset by the sorrow he feels for Gatsby and his thwarted love story.

    • Is it correct to say: he did not even feel a little sorrow for him?

    Fragrant Regards,,,
    GuidanceHD

  2. GuidanceHD
    Guest
    #2

    Re: The Great Gatsby: A Matter of Style.

    Would someone kindly lend me a hand? Sorry to post all these at once, but I need to hand my paper in this week.
    Much Obliged.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: The Great Gatsby: A Matter of Style.

    Quote Originally Posted by GuidanceHD View Post
    Given that this is for an Academic research paper, would you kindly mark out the better choice of the two provided in red (in literary or stylistic terms). Suggestions other than those mentioned here are most welcome.


    • “Myrtle was killed in cold blood as Daisy and Tom have the money and power necessary to cover them up/ cover up for them” - I don't think either of these is correct. I would say "Daisy and Tom have the money and power necessary to cover it up". It = the murder.


    • Gatsby is murdered "with ease" and (is) gone without the respectable funeral he deserved for “his hospitality” at least.

    Gatsby is murdered with ease and has gone without the respectable funeral he deserved for “his hospitality” at least.
    (May I use “with ease” as a substitute for “in cold blood”? Are there other (literary) alternatives?)

    "With ease" does not mean the same as "in cold blood". "In cold blood" means with no warning and without the deceased having the chance to defend himself. "With ease" simply means it was an easy task for the killer.

    I would say Gatsby "went without the respectable funeral...." = "to go without" means to not get or to not have something.



    • Is it acceptable to say: she assumed the role of a lady full well, as analogous to: he knows full well? No - "She fully assumed the role of a lady".



    • …characterized not only by moral laxity but also by lack of taste (Is it “more literary” to repeat by?) - I would say that you definitely need to repeat "by", in a literary context or not.


    • He was a friend of Daisy’s/Daisy? - Daisy's, though "He was one of Daisy's friends" is a little better.


    • …regardless of who loves her better/more? - more


    • …the incidents fire up even more until they are eventually extinguished with Gatsby shot dead/ being shot dead in his pool? - being shot dead.


    • The main symbol of the novel is Gatsby, and his greatness is the centre of (the?) dispute.Yes, you definitely need the word "the" here. It is a specific dispute that is being referred to.


    • On another occasion (are there other “literary” synonyms?) - Once/previously/once before/at another time


    • Any contempt the reader might feel/ have for Tom and Daisy is offset by the sorrow he feels for Gatsby and his thwarted love story. - Feel. The clue is in the 2nd half of the sentence when "feels" is used.


    • Is it correct to say: he did not even feel a little sorrow for him? I would say "he did not feel even a little bit sorry for him". You generally "feel sorrow" but you "feel sorry FOR someone..."


    Fragrant Regards,,,
    GuidanceHD
    My responses are above, marked in blue. Hope they help. I am about to go out so my answers had to be done quite fast.

  4. GuidanceHD
    Guest
    #4

    Thumbs up Re: The Great Gatsby: A Matter of Style.

    • Is it correct to say: he did not even feel a little sorrow for him? I would say "he did not feel even a little bit sorry for him". You generally "feel sorrow" but you "feel sorry FOR someone..."
    What about "she never bothers to come to his funeral, or even show little sorrow for the man whose life depended on hers. "


    ------
    Which is better, separate "other than" or join them?

    • To begin with, the characterisation in The Great Gatsby adopts modernist ways of depiction other than those of the earlier literary movements.
    • To begin with, the characterisation in The Great Gatsby adopts other modernist ways of depiction than those of the earlier literary movements.

    • By analogy to/with – as analogous to/with?
    Many thanks indeed, Mr.

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