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    #1

    at vs in

    Is this sentence correct?

    One can do his internship either at a law firm or a court.

    I think it should be "or in court," but I'm not sure.

    Thanks.

  1. kfredson's Avatar

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    #2

    Re: at vs in

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    Is this sentence correct?

    One can do his internship either at a law firm or a court.

    I think it should be "or in court," but I'm not sure.

    Thanks.
    When we say "in court" we usually mean literally in a courtroom proceeding.
    "His attorney did an admirable job yesterday in court."
    However, when we speak about going to a particular court on legal business we are more likely to use "at."
    "I will meet you tomorrow at the county court." This implies that you are meeting at the courthouse building.

    Now, if you are interning, I would assume you are planning to work at court, doing a variety of tasks that may not be happening only in a courtroom.

    I am not very schooled in legal internships, however, so someone else may have a better idea about this.

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    #3

    Re: at vs in

    Quote Originally Posted by kfredson View Post
    When we say "in court" we usually mean literally in a courtroom proceeding.
    "His attorney did an admirable job yesterday in court."
    However, when we speak about going to a particular court on legal business we are more likely to use "at."
    "I will meet you tomorrow at the county court." This implies that you are meeting at the courthouse building.

    Now, if you are interning, I would assume you are planning to work at court, doing a variety of tasks that may not be happening only in a courtroom.

    I am not very schooled in legal internships, however, so someone else may have a better idea about this.
    So you would say "intern at court" instead of "intern at a court"?

    Thanks.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: at vs in

    Wouldn't you write "One can do one's internship" instead of "One can do his internship"?

    ("At court" sounds better to me, but I, too, am not aware of how these are used in practice.)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: at vs in

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Wouldn't you write "One can do one's internship" instead of "One can do his internship"?

    ("At court" sounds better to me, but I, too, am not aware of how these are used in practice.)
    I tought "his" was correct; I saw the "one...his" construction in a law book I read. Do you think it's incorrect?

    Thanks.

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    #6

    Re: at vs in

    I rarely use the "one" form, so I'm not an expert.

    I tend to rewrite things like that as "students can do their internships."

    I am one of those people who doesn't like using "his" to mean either men or women.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. kfredson's Avatar

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    #7

    Re: at vs in

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    So you would say "intern at court" instead of "intern at a court"?

    Thanks.
    I really am not sure. I don't know what kind of internships are available. It would help to say a little more specifically what is envisioned here.

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    #8

    Re: at vs in

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    Is this sentence correct?

    One can do his internship either at a law firm or a court.

    I think it should be "or in court," but I'm not sure.

    Thanks.
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Good afternoon, Jasmin.

    (1) I'm sure you did what I did: visit our friend Google.

    (2) It seems that quite a few people are quite comfortable with "with."

    (3) Here are just two examples:

    ...will arrange to do his/her own summer internship with a court.

    a paralegal internship with a court or other judicial center gives. ....

    (4) I wonder if anyone besides me likes the ring of:

    One may do his/her internship at a law firm or with a court.

    (5) Perhaps the "correct" preposition (with/in/at) depends on many factors, including the particular nature of the noun "internship." It does seem to be of a rather abstract nature, doesn't it? I am unable, however, to put my finger on it.

    (6) Hopefully, a law student will give you the "correct" answer. Please let all of us know.

    Have a nice day!

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