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  1. Offroad's Avatar
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    #1

    said before

    Dear teachers...

    the present perfect is tormenting me again... Could you please comment on the correctness of the following sentences (?):

    1. As I said before, the car is broken.
    2. As I have said before, the car is expensive.
    3. As I said previously, the cat is sick.
    4. As I have said previously, the dog is heavy.

    Considering the fact those facts was said only one time, which ones are grammatically correct?

    Many thanks

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    #2

    Re: said before

    The past tense goes with before.

    As I said before/previous.
    As I have said...

    not a teacher
    Last edited by tedtmc; 13-Apr-2010 at 11:47.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: said before

    Quote Originally Posted by Offroad View Post
    Dear teachers...

    the present perfect is tormenting me again... Could you please comment on the correctness of the following sentences (?):

    1. As I said before, the car is broken.
    2. As I have said before, the car is expensive.
    3. As I said previously, the cat is sick.
    4. As I have said previously, the dog is heavy.

    Considering the fact those facts was said only one time, which ones are grammatically correct?

    Many thanks
    If they were said only one time, any of the above are correct.

    If they've been said more than once, I would use the present perfect - because you aren't referring to a specific time in the past, but several times, none of which are specifically referred to.

    I've told you this a thousand times! Correct
    * I told you this a thousand times! Not as good.

    As I said last week ... (specific time mentioned) -> simple past
    As I've said before ... (specific time not mentioned) -> pres. perf.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: said before

    I get a different feel for this. If you said these things only ONE time, I would use the simple past.

    "As I have said before" definitely implies to me that you've said these things more than once.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. Offroad's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: said before

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    I get a different feel for this. If you said these things only ONE time, I would use the simple past.

    "As I have said before" definitely implies to me that you've said these things more than once.
    Does that work if I don't know when I warned about those statements?

    I have mentioned before (can't remember when) that this car would not do 100 mph.
    I mentioned before (can't remember when) that this car would not do 100 mph.

    Thanks

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: said before

    Not really - no change. If I see the present perfect, I assume you've said it more than once, in the reasonably recent past. If you said it 100 times but the most recent time you said it was 3 years ago, then simple past would make more sense.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  6. Offroad's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: said before

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Not really - no change. If I see the present perfect, I assume you've said it more than once, in the reasonably recent past.
    I guess in the UK they may have different opinions, at least, about that sentence in particular.

    For example:

    I have broken my leg. I can't walk now.

    However, in such sentences, I agree that the perfect perfect is optional. A matter of fashion, choice!

  7. Offroad's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: said before

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    If they were said only one time, any of the above are correct.
    Many thanks.

  8. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: said before

    Quote Originally Posted by Offroad View Post
    I guess in the UK they may have different opinions, at least, about that sentence in particular.

    For example:

    I have broken my leg. I can't walk now.

    However, in such sentences, I agree that the perfect perfect is optional. A matter of fashion, choice!
    I would say that too.
    I thought we were talking specifically about "as I've said before."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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