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  1. #1

    any difference???

    Is there any difference between these two sentences?
    I FEEL BAD
    &
    I FEEL BADLY
    is it possible that "bad" and "Badly" have any subtle difference???

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: any difference???

    Quote Originally Posted by Sommy View Post
    Is there any difference between these two sentences?
    I FEEL BAD
    &
    I FEEL BADLY
    is it possible that "bad" and "Badly" have any subtle difference???
    Well, to me, "I feel bad" is the only correct sentence. You don't really "feel" badly, you "do something" badly. For example:

    I play tennis badly.
    I paint badly.

    "I feel bad" can mean "I feel sick" or "I feel guilty".

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    #3

    Re: any difference???

    Quote Originally Posted by Sommy View Post
    Is there any difference between these two sentences?
    I FEEL BAD
    &
    I FEEL BADLY
    is it possible that "bad" and "Badly" have any subtle difference???
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Good afternoon, Sommy.

    (1) Yes, there is actually a difference.

    (2) Probably 99 times out of 100 times, you need to say "I feel bad":

    (a) I am sick. So I feel bad today.

    (b) I have a guilty conscience.

    (i) For example, I was disrespectful to my mother. I feel bad.

    (a) Many native speakers say, "I feel badLY" for "I have a guilty conscience," but the grammar books say that is NOT correct. Use "bad."

    (3) "I feel badly" is almost never used in "correct" English.

    (a) But there is one time when it is correct:

    SUSAN: I bought this material for a new dress. Please feel it and tell me how it feels to your touch. Is it smooth enough for a dress?

    MONA: I'm sorry, but I can't!

    SUSAN: Why not?

    MONA: Have you forgotten that I broke my fingers two days ago? I still feel badLY. ( = I feel things with my fingers in a bad way. My fingers are broken, so when I touch something, I cannot feel things WELL. I can only feel things badLY.)

    Have a nice day!

  3. #4

    Re: any difference???

    Thanks a lot for disclosing such a minute point.A non native like me would never have discovered such a subtle difference.
    Thank you very much

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    #5

    Re: any difference???

    Quote Originally Posted by Sommy View Post
    Thanks a lot for disclosing such a minute point.A non native like me would never have discovered such a subtle difference.
    Thank you very much
    ***** NOT A TEACHER !!!

    Good afternoon, Sommy.

    Thank you for your kind note.

    Many native speakers don't know that minute point, either.

    Have a nice day.

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