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    #1

    pizza/pizzas

    1. Which do you like, pizza or fried chicken?
    2. Which do you like, pizzas or fried chicken?
    #1 is supposed to be correct. Is #2 also acceptable?

  1. kfredson's Avatar

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    #2

    Re: pizza/pizzas

    Quote Originally Posted by sitifan View Post
    1. Which do you like, pizza or fried chicken?
    2. Which do you like, pizzas or fried chicken?
    #1 is supposed to be correct. Is #2 also acceptable?
    Number one is correct. You are talking about types of food, hence the use of the singular. If for some reason you did want to use the plural, you would have to say, Which do you like, pizzas or fried chickens?

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    #3

    Re: pizza/pizzas

    Could you please give me an example that uses "fried chickens"?
    I was taught that "fried chicken" was never used in the plural.


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    #4

    Re: pizza/pizzas

    (Not a teacher)

    'Fried chickens' is avoided for the same reason as 'pizzas'. They are types of food and are thus singular.

    I can't think of any reason why you would want to use plural. Even so, it doesn't sound particularly wrong to use them in the plural form in this sentence.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: pizza/pizzas

    Quote Originally Posted by sitifan View Post
    Could you please give me an example that uses "fried chickens"?
    I was taught that "fried chicken" was never used in the plural.
    Boss at food shop: Have you put the fried chickens in the hotbox yet?

    Caller: I'd like to order three fried chickens please.


    You were taught wrong.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: pizza/pizzas

    Quote Originally Posted by sitifan View Post
    I think "pizza" and "fried chicken" are different.
    1. He bought a pizza yesterday.
    2. He bought a fried chicken yesterday.
    #1 is acceptable. But #2 seems not.
    No, you're allowed to buy one fried chicken. But if you buy two, they are called 'fried chickens'. You can also buy one pizza or two pizzas. These terms follow the usual rules for plurals in English.

    When they're used to mean food, they will usually be expressed as uncountable nouns.
    You may buy two 'cabbages'. But you eat 'cabbage'.
    You buy chickens and pizzas, but you eat 'chicken' and/or 'pizza' (or even a chicken pizza).


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    #7

    Re: pizza/pizzas

    Quote Originally Posted by sitifan View Post
    I think "pizza" and "fried chicken" are different.
    1. He bought a pizza yesterday.
    2. He bought a fried chicken yesterday.
    #1 is acceptable. But #2 seems not.
    In this sense, pizza and fried chicken are different. Pizza is one whole thing, fried chicken is normally lots of parts of different chickens together in one tub/bowl/pot.

    The reason why 1. is alright is because you are specifying the amount of pizza. 'A fried chicken' means 'a whole chicken, fried' - this is not the same as 'fried chicken', the food.

    You could equally say 'He bought pizza yesterday.' and 'He bought fried chicken yesterday'.

    What Raymott said is how it is - both can be either expressed as uncountable when they are acting as a type of food and both can be expressed as plural when the specific amount is needed. The difference is that you can't have 'one fried chicken' without changing the meaning as I said before.

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