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    #1

    dismis

    Hi All,

    I am not comfortable using the dismiss while speaking. Please let me know the correct in/on the following sentences

    1. My son's school dismisses at 2pm every day
    2. Can we dismiss now as i am getting late?
    3. What is the dismissal time for his class generally?

    Thanks & Regards
    Gauri

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    #2

    Re: dismis

    Quote Originally Posted by gauri_agr View Post
    Hi All,

    I am not comfortable using the dismiss while speaking. Please let me know the correct in/on if the word is correctly used in the following sentences:

    1. My son's school dismisses at 2pm every day
    2. Can we dismiss (be dismissed) now as i am getting late?
    3. What is the dismissal time for his class generally?

    Thanks & Regards
    Gauri
    .

    not a teacher

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    #3

    Re: dismis

    #1 and #2 are not correct, IMO.

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    #4

    Re: dismis

    thanks a lot. Just one more doubt. SCHOOL is a building so would that be proper to use dismiss in 1st sentence?

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    #5

    Re: dismis

    Quote Originally Posted by corum View Post
    None of the sentences are correct, IMO.
    Why?

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    #6

    Re: dismis

    Quote Originally Posted by gauri_agr View Post
    thanks a lot. Just one more doubt. SCHOOL is a building so would that be proper to use dismiss in 1st sentence?
    school/building - singular - dismisses

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    #7

    Re: dismis

    Quote Originally Posted by tedtmc View Post
    Why?
    dismiss is not an ergative verb, as far as I know.

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    #8

    Re: dismis

    Quote Originally Posted by corum View Post
    dismiss is not an ergative verb, as far as I know.
    What is an ergative verb? Sorry, I am no good at grammar jargons but I am positive 1 & 3 are correct.

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    #9

    Re: dismis

    Quote Originally Posted by tedtmc View Post
    .

    not a teacher
    Your #2 with "be dismissed" is definitely correct. #1 and #3 are ok.

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    #10

    Re: dismis

    We baked a cake. 'bake' is transitive, right?
    'bake' has intransitive uses too. We can create another sentence with 'bake' where the direct object of the original sentence becomes the subject: A cake baked. This makes 'bake an ergative verb. Easy. #3 is okay.

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