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    • Join Date: Apr 2010
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    #1

    have/had and did

    i want to know how to use have/had and did...i am so confused....here are some examples:

    did u do ur homework?
    have u done ur homework?

    what is the difference between the two sentences...
    is it rite that we can use both in the same sense..

  1. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: have/had and did

    Quote Originally Posted by rafeezah View Post
    I want to know how to use have/had and did...I am so confused....here are some examples:

    Did you do your homework?
    Have you done your homework?

    What is the difference between the two sentences?
    Is it right that we can use both in the same sense?
    The difference is if this homework can still be done.

    Sentence 1:

    Example:
    You are not a pupil anymore.
    Your son asks you:
    "Daddy, when you were in school, did you do your homework?"

    Example 2:
    Your teacher: "I think that test was not very hard."
    You: "It was too difficult!"
    Your teacher: "Did you do your homework?"
    You: "No, I did not."
    Your teacher: "Well, then it's logical that it was too difficult for you."

    Example 3:
    I did not do my homework last week.
    That week is over - it's past.


    Sentence 2:
    Example:
    You have to do your homework until tomorrow.
    Your mother comes in your room and asks you:
    Your mother: "Have you done your homework?"
    You: "No, I have not done it yet."

    It's still possible that you do your homework - it's not too late.

    Example 2:
    Today is Thursday (example!)
    I have done all my homework this week.
    The week is not over, so it's possible that you get more homework

    Usually, it's grammatically seen correct how you wrote these sentence.
    (Except the things I fixed.)
    However, in sentence 2 some people would add something:
    I have done all my homework so far.
    I have not done all my homework yet.
    It's not wrong not so use these words, but maybe it's more common...

    P.S. Please get rid of u and ur. It's you and your

    **Neither a teacher nor a native speaker.**

    Cheers!

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: have/had and did

    Excellent post!
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #4

    Re: have/had and did

    I always have this confusion. Thanks for (the) clarification.

    Can I use "the" before "clarification"

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    #5

    Re: have/had and did

    Quote Originally Posted by gauri_agr View Post
    I always have this confusion. Thanks for (the) clarification.

    Can I use "the" before "clarification"
    Yes, and you should do so!

    It refers to "The clarification you just provided" so it's a specific reference.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #6

    Re: have/had and did

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    The difference is if this homework can still be done.
    Sorry, I don't agree with that statement.

    Your mother knows you had some homework to do this evening, and it is getting closer to your bedtime.

    She can say 'Did you do your homework?' or 'Have you done your homework?'

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    #7

    Re: have/had and did

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    Sorry, I don't agree with that statement.

    Your mother knows you had some homework to do this evening, and it is getting closer to your bedtime.

    She can say 'Did you do your homework?' or 'Have you done your homework?'
    I agree. The simple past is used in this context in parts of North America by some people.
    Elsewhere, the present perfect is almost invariably used for sentences of this type.

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    #8

    Re: have/had and did

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I agree. The simple past is used in this context in parts of North America by some people.
    Elsewhere, the present perfect is almost invariably used for sentences of this type.
    But you make it sound like using the simple past in this context is barely acceptable and is only used by a few fringe groups.
    I can assure you that the simple past is grammatically and semantically every bit as good as the present perfect. I know because I, as well as other people, use both.
    If you prefer to use present perfect that is your privilege, but the implication that simple past is not as good as present perfect in this context is just wrong.

    The only way simple past can be 'wrong' is if one arbitrarily defines it as being wrong in this context. That's exactly what some people who are very fond of perfect tense have done.

    [We don't use it; therefore it's wrong. So (we) don't use it.]
    Last edited by 2006; 18-Apr-2010 at 00:58. Reason: correct spelling

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    #9

    Re: have/had and did

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    But you make it sound like using the simple past in this context is barely acceptable and is only used by a few fringe groups.
    I was going to write: "some people, such as 2006, prefer the simple past in this context"; but I've given you the benefit of the doubt and accepted that perhaps your opinion is based on a population wider than just yourself. So, I think the geographical region I mentioned would cover it, unless you have evidence of more widespread usage.

    PS: Yes, I do consider the simple past to be inherently inferior to the present perfect for this context because the focus is on the present (Is the homework done now?; Has the homework been done?) not on the past (Did you do the homework? Was the homework done at some time in the past?)
    Last edited by Raymott; 18-Apr-2010 at 15:22.

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    #10

    Smile Re: have/had and did

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I'm not very surprised at your response, but I was hoping that you would have a better understanding of simple past tense. My goal is not to change your way of thinking but I will, for the others who read this, continue.

    I was going to write: "some people, such as 2006, prefer the simple past in this context"; I didn't say I prefer the simple past; I said the simple past is equally as good as the present perfect in the context of the "homework" question. And those of us who use both tenses in contexts similar to that of this thread could be said to have a better understanding of the (relationship between the) two tenses.

    but I've given you the benefit of the doubt and accepted that perhaps your opinion is based on a population wider than just yourself. Thanks a lot! Are you sure that could be possible?

    So, I think the geographical region I mentioned would cover it, unless you have evidence of more widespread usage. I don't just listen to people who live within a few kilometers of me. I do listen to national American and Canadian programs.

    PS: Yes, I do consider the simple past to be inherently inferior to the present perfect for this context because the focus is on the present
    Well now you have firmly planted yourself in with the crowd that has arbitrarily and unjustifiably defined simple past tense as having no relevance to the present. What nonsense that is!

    (Is the homework done now?; Has the homework been done?) not on the past (Did you do the homework? Was the homework done at some time in the past?) Obviously if the homework (is)(was)(has been) done, it had to be done "at some time in the past". When else could it have been done? Could it have been done in the future or in the present?
    The past is not a number of (years)(weeks)(hours) ago. A minute or second ago is also the past!

    Perhaps you mean to say that the simple past tense (does)(can) not have relevance to the present. That's more nonsense that those of you who are, in my opinion, overly fond of perfect tense espouse.

    a similar question from the past on usingenglish.com
    Which is correct?

    a) My stomach hurts. I have eaten too much.
    b) My stomach hurts. I ate too much.

    The answer is that both sentences are equally correct. In both second sentences the grammar is correct and the meaning is very clear. So how can either one be wrong?
    My stomach hurts because I (have eaten)(ate) too much.

    Of course someone answered that only a) is correct because simple past has no relevance to the present. That's the same as you are saying now, and it's still wrong.

    I don't know why some of you choose to put such a restriction on the simple past tense. But whatever reason you have is not justified by any kind of logic that I can see. I think you just don't understand the simple past tense.

    Lastly, one result of the above is that the learning of perfect tense is made even harder for students than it already is.
    The overselling of perfect tense leads to many examples of inappropriate and/or incorrect use of perfect tense, a least partly because of the erroneous notion that the simple past tense has no relevance to the present. It not only steers students' sentences away from simple past but also away from present tense.

    'I've been at home last night.'
    'I've been here for the first time.'
    2006

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