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    #1

    Question 2rd conditional sentences -> subjunctive mood?

    I know 3rd conditional sentences definitely belong to the ambit of subjunctive mood, yet how about 2rd conditional sentences?

    As we know, 3rd conditional sentences are hypothetical statements, and hence subjunctive mood. But how about 2rd conditional sentences, they are statements of improbability.

    Do we have a clear cut between improbabilities and hypotheses?
    If any, Could you tell me the difference between 2 sentences below?
    1. I would rather you paid cheque.
    2. I would rather you would have paid cheque.

    to me,
    first sentence is improbable, as I wish you would pay cheque.
    second sentence is hypothetic, as it is impossible to happen because it had passed.
    so they are both in subjunctive mood, but actually there is a difference.
    Have grammarians factored them in when setting the rules?

    Good day.
    Last edited by panicmonger; 17-Apr-2010 at 05:29.

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    #2

    Exclamation Re: 2rd conditional sentences -> subjunctive mood?

    Quote Originally Posted by panicmonger View Post
    I know 3rd conditional sentences definitely belong to the ambit of subjunctive mood, yet how about 2rd conditional sentences?

    As we know, 3rd conditional sentences are hypothetical statements, and hence subjunctive mood. But how about 2rd conditional sentences, they are statements of improbability.

    Do we have a clear cut between improbabilities and hypotheses?
    If any, Could you tell me the difference between 2 sentences below?
    1. I would rather you paid the cheque.
    2. I would rather you had paid the cheque.

    to me,
    first sentence is improbable, No It is passible (as I wish you would pay) cheque.
    second sentence is hypothetic, as it is impossible to happen because it had passed. Use past perfect and it works.
    so they are both in subjunctive mood, but actually there is a difference.
    Have grammarians factored them in when setting the rules?

    Good day.
    You can not use “would have’ in the second sentence. We can use would rather to say that one person would prefer another or others to do something and for that we use the structure: Would rather + subject + past tense (simple past or past perfect)

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    #3

    Re: 2rd conditional sentences -> subjunctive mood?

    I know 3rd conditional sentences definitely belong to the ambit of subjunctive mood, yet how about 2rd conditional sentences?
    The second conditional uses the past subjunctive (If I were), though this usage is not universal among native speakers, many of whom use was.


    I would rather you paid by cheque.
    (If you mean bill, then I would use pay the check.)

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