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  1. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #1

    The name for this kind of alley...

    Hi,

    I addresses there's an alleyway, or a street whose end is blocked with either a wall or a house...What's the name for such passes in BrE? I mean the term which is used by people or the one which is put before the name of the street or alley on the signs...MANY thanks in advance...

    (Could "IMPASS" be used?)

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    #2

    Re: The name for this kind of alley...

    cul-de-sac?

  2. #3

    Re: The name for this kind of alley...

    If it's in a residential area, I would call it a 'court'. That might just be AmE though.

    -Not a teacher.-

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: The name for this kind of alley...

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan View Post
    Hi,

    I addresses there's an alleyway, or a street whose end is blocked with either a wall or a house...What's the name for such passes in BrE? I mean the term which is used by people or the one which is put before the name of the street or alley on the signs...MANY thanks in advance...

    (Could "IMPASS" be used?)
    In the UK, it's called a cul de sac. (The French is "impasse".) It's interesting that in the UK we use a French phrase for this type of road, yet the phrase "cul de sac" is not used in French. It literally means "bottom of the bag". My French friends were very surprised to learn the UK's use of the phrase!

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: The name for this kind of alley...

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan View Post
    Hi,

    I addresses there's an alleyway, or a street whose end is blocked with either a wall or a house...What's the name for such passes in BrE? I mean the term which is used by people or the one which is put before the name of the street or alley on the signs...MANY thanks in advance...

    (Could "IMPASS" be used?)
    If it's really an alley (a narrow passage between buildings), and it really ends with a wall, rather than with another house, then "blind alley" is perhaps the term you want.

    This term is also used metaphorically:
    Definition of blind alley noun from Cambridge Dictionary Online: Free English Dictionary and Thesaurus

  5. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: The name for this kind of alley...

    In the US there is actually a long list of criteria that must be considered before such a street as you described is officially marked either "Dead End" or "No Outlet" or "Not a Through Street." If you were describing such a street to someone, however, you'd usually call it a "dead end" or a "cul-de-sac".

  6. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: The name for this kind of alley...

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    In the UK, it's called a cul de sac. (The French is "impasse".) It's interesting that in the UK we use a French phrase for this type of road, yet the phrase "cul de sac" is not used in French. It literally means "bottom of the bag". My French friends were very surprised to learn the UK's use of the phrase!
    If it's the official name of a street then : "Impasse du Château", for example, is correct in French, but when speaking in general it's "voie sans issue".

  7. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: The name for this kind of alley...

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    In the UK, it's called a cul de sac. (The French is "impasse".) It's interesting that in the UK we use a French phrase for this type of road, yet the phrase "cul de sac" is not used in French. It literally means "bottom of the bag". My French friends were very surprised to learn the UK's use of the phrase!


    Thanks to all dear posters...So, could we have, for example, "Cul de sac George" on a sign?

  8. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: The name for this kind of alley...

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan View Post
    Thanks to all dear posters...So, could we have, for example, "Cul de sac George" on a sign?
    Ah, no!!! It's not a type of "street name". It would say, for instance, "George Street/Road/Avenue etc" on the road sign, then there would be an information sign (just a picture) which tells you that the road is a cul de sac (or a dead end, or a "No Through Road")

  9. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: The name for this kind of alley...

    ...and how about he word "close" in BrE? In Cambridge Dictionary this definition is given...
    UK a road, usually with private houses, which vehicles can only enter from one end
    He lives at 83 Barker Close.

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