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    two-word verbs

    I can say Put the coat on.
    Put on the coat.
    Put it on.
    I can't say Put on it.

    Here is the question.

    Put down these dictionaries.
    Put these dictionaries down.
    Put these done.

    Can I say Put down these.

    Thank you.

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    Re: two-word verbs

    In terms of relative position of the particle in relation to the verb, we distinguish three types of transitive phrasal verbs:

    1. separable optional
    It means the object of the verb can come between the verb and the particle or it can come after them. However, if the object is a pronoun, it always has to come between them.

    Put your coat on.
    Put on your coat.
    Put it on.
    Put on it.

    2. separable obligatory
    Separation is always mandatory.

    For example:
    Definition from Cambridge Dictionary Online: Free English Dictionary and Thesaurus

    3. inseparable
    The particle and the verb are inseparable. Nothing can come between them.

    I came across this vase.
    I came across it.
    I came this vase across.
    I came it across.

    Can I say "Put down these"?
    Strange. It does not sound bad to my ears; still I can't comes up with an explanation as to why it should be okay.

    Put it down.
    Put down the receiver.

    It means the pv is separable optional. Separable optional pv's have their pronoun objects obligatorily surrounded by the verb and its particle.

    Put down it.
    Put down these.
    Put down these tools.

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    Re: two-word verbs

    In general (there are always exceptions to every rule) phrasal verbs, e.g. "put down" may not be followed by a pronoun. This, that, these and those are demonstrative pronouns.

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