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    #1

    money

    Dear teachers,

    I have two questions:

    No.1
    I'm sorry I don't have enough cash ______ to buy the house.
    The key is "on hand". Can I use "in hand" in this sentence?

    No.2
    In times of economic difficulties, it is the poor peple who usually go under first.
    Can I say "During times of economic difficulties"?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

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    #2

    Re: money

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Dear teachers,

    I have two questions:

    No.1
    I'm sorry I don't have enough cash ______ to buy the house.
    The key is "on hand". Can I use "in hand" in this sentence?

    No. If you are saying that you have/do not have something immediately available then the phrase is either "on hand" or "at hand".

    No.2
    In times of economic difficulties, it is the poor peple who usually go under first.
    Can I say "During times of economic difficulties"?

    I would say that you can, yes, although I would personally say that it should be "economic difficulty".

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Comments are above.

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    #3

    Re: money

    Dear emsr2d2,

    Thank you so much for your explanation. I understand No.2.

    I have problem with No.2. I think my problem is I can neither understand the definition in the dictionary and your explanation.

    The following is from the dictionary:
    on hand
    (UK also to hand)
    near to someone or something, and ready to help or be used if necessary
    time/money in hand: time or money that is available to be used.
    I can't see the difference between the two.

    Your explanation:
    No. If you are saying that you have/do not have something immediately available then the phrase is either "on hand" or "at hand".

    I am trying my best to find out the answer:
    on hand/ at hand: the money is right there. You are holding the money in your hand and can buy something right now.
    money in hand: the money is somewhere in the bank or at home. But if this is correct what about "time in hand"?

    I get totally confused.

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang




    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
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    #4

    Re: money

    'Cash in hand' means physically having the money in notes, so it doesn't really make sense for buying a house. If you are paid 'cash in hand', you are paid in cash, often without a receipt to avoid paying tax.

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    #5

    Re: money

    Hi Tdol,

    I get confused.
    Do you mean according to my understanding we don't buy a house with cash? Or does it mean "we buy house with check"? And if the sentence is not "to buy the house" but other articles then can I use "cash/money in hand"?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    'Cash in hand' means physically having the money in notes, so it doesn't really make sense for buying a house. If you are paid 'cash in hand', you are paid in cash, often without a receipt to avoid paying tax.

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    #6

    Re: money

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Hi Tdol,

    I get confused.
    Do you mean according to my understanding we don't buy a house with cash? Or does it mean "we buy house with check"? And if the sentence is not "to buy the house" but other articles then can I use "cash/money in hand"?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

    In the UK, at least, if you buy a house "for cash" it simply means that you pay for the whole house in total at the beginning, without having to have a mortgage or a loan to make part of the payment.

    If you bought a house "in cash" it would mean that you physically had the money (notes and coins) with you. I don't think very many people would actually physically have hundreds of thousands of pounds, dollars, Euros, etc in cash!!!!

    For example, at a restaurant, you might be asked:

    "Do you want to pay on a credit card or in cash?"

    If you answer "In cash" then you would actually hand over physical money.

    I have personally never heard the terms "time/money in hand" used to mean time or money available for use, but probably some other people have.

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    #7

    Re: money

    Dear emsr2d2,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I understand it.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    In the UK, at least, if you buy a house "for cash" it simply means that you pay for the whole house in total at the beginning, without having to have a mortgage or a loan to make part of the payment.

    If you bought a house "in cash" it would mean that you physically had the money (notes and coins) with you. I don't think very many people would actually physically have hundreds of thousands of pounds, dollars, Euros, etc in cash!!!!

    For example, at a restaurant, you might be asked:

    "Do you want to pay on a credit card or in cash?"

    If you answer "In cash" then you would actually hand over physical money.

    I have personally never heard the terms "time/money in hand" used to mean time or money available for use, but probably some other people have.

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    #8

    Re: money

    Hi emsr2d2,

    It occurred to me that I might misunderstood you so I'd like to make sure I understand you.

    In times of economic difficulties, it is the poor people who usually go under first.
    Can I say "During times of economic difficulties"?

    I would say that you can, yes, although I would personally say that it should be "economic difficulty".

    Do you mean if I use "during" then it should be "economic difficulty" and if I use "in times of" I should use "economic difficulties (this is from the textbook)"?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang




    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Comments are above.

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    #9

    Re: money

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Hi emsr2d2,

    It occurred to me that I might misunderstood you so I'd like to make sure I understand you.

    In times of economic difficulties, it is the poor people who usually go under first.
    Can I say "During times of economic difficulties"?

    I would say that you can, yes, although I would personally say that it should be "economic difficulty".

    Do you mean if I use "during" then it should be "economic difficulty" and if I use "in times of" I should use "economic difficulties (this is from the textbook)"?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    If versus during doesn't really make any difference. I was simply saying that, to me ".....times of economic difficulty....." sounds a little better than "difficulties".

    Of course, it could be changed to "In/during economically difficult times......." !!

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