Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. Newbie
    Student or Learner

    • Join Date: Apr 2010
    • Posts: 7
    #1

    ambiguous meanings

    what does it means?

    the king of Egland's people

    one possible meaning is " the Egland's people' king" ?

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,216
    #2

    Re: ambiguous meanings

    What does it mean?

    Please note: It's spelled England.

    No it cannot refer to the king himself. Whether it means all of England or the specific group of people who take care of him/support him, I can't tell, but it's the kings people, not the people's king.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. Newbie
    Student or Learner

    • Join Date: Apr 2010
    • Posts: 7
    #3

    Re: ambiguous meanings

    thanks a lot!

    so the one meaning is

    [the king of England's] people

    right?


    does the NP have another possible meaning?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,842
    #4

    Re: ambiguous meanings

    In what context did you see this?

  4. Newbie
    Student or Learner

    • Join Date: Apr 2010
    • Posts: 7
    #5

    Re: ambiguous meanings

    it's not in the article.
    i'm studying Andrew Raford's transformatinal grammar.
    we need to analyze the ambiguity meanings in the NP

    just like

    a toy factory

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,216
    #6

    Re: ambiguous meanings

    I see.

    "The King of England" is so strongly joined as a phrase that you would have to deliberately seek a misinterpretation.

    We tend not to say a monarch "of a country's people" but a monarch of a country.

    With "a toy factory," it would be immediately obvious which you meant in a context. If you simply saw that phrase spray painted on a wall you wouldn't know, but you'd surely know if you were talking about a factory that made toys, or a toy that was in the form of a factory.

    With the king [of England's people] you'd be asking your reader to change the way they traditionally say this.

    Verbally, you could say "The king [pause] of England'speople [almost as one word]" and you would probably get them to take this meaning.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #7

    Re: ambiguous meanings

    Quote Originally Posted by keitin View Post
    it's not in the article.
    i'm studying Andrew Raford's transformatinal grammar.
    we need to analyze the ambiguity meanings in the NP

    just like

    a toy factory
    *****NOT A TEACHER *****

    Good morning, keitin.

    (1) Congratulations on studying transformational grammar. It is too difficult for me to understand.

    (2) I just thought that you would like to know something that I read in A GRAMMAR OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE, by Dr. George O. Curme, written in "the old days" (1931):

    (a) Today we say: the King of England's property.

    (b) Until the year 1500, we said: The king's property of England.

    (c) Professor Curme explains that the English people decided to stop this because when people spoke, people would think you were saying: The kings (plural) of England property.

    (d) Therefore, the people decided to treat "king of England" as a unit/group.

    (i) So today we say: The king of England's property. (We are talking about one king.)

    (ii) As Dr. Curme says, we now keep the plural for a sentence such as:

    The kings of England now have less power than formerly.

    Thanks for the great question.

  6. Newbie
    Student or Learner

    • Join Date: Apr 2010
    • Posts: 7
    #8

    Re: ambiguous meanings

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    *****NOT A TEACHER *****

    Good morning, keitin.

    (1) Congratulations on studying transformational grammar. It is too difficult for me to understand.

    Really thank's a lot

    transformational grammar is really difficulty for me, too!

    ha

    i always spend one day long doing the exercises


    ---------------------------------
    also thanks Barb_D
    ---------------------------------

    i know how to do my homework

  7. Newbie
    Student or Learner

    • Join Date: Apr 2010
    • Posts: 7
    #9

    Re: ambiguous meanings

    can i ask one more question?

    i need to find the possible differences in structure between the bracketed NPs in

    She's [another friend of Mary]
    She's [another friend of Mary's]

    (simply assume that of Mary and of Mary's are PPs, don't concern with the internal structure of these PPs)

    i think is that

    [another] [friend of Mary]
    [anothr friend] of Mary's

Similar Threads

  1. ambiguous meanings of a bass button holder?
    By spoon in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 19-Apr-2010, 18:17
  2. [Idiom] Difficult Test
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-Mar-2009, 19:07
  3. the different meanings?
    By Kirsten P in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 27-Feb-2009, 00:43
  4. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 10-Apr-2008, 17:55
  5. ambiguous
    By navi tasan in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 23-Sep-2003, 18:52

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •