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    #1

    thinly

    The chef says "The beauty of the fresh mozzarella is that it melts very thinly"

    What is the meaning of "thinly" here?

    Thanks.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: thinly

    No idea Was the chef a native speaker of English? He may have meant it melts at a low temperature, or when it melts it becomes a 'thinner' liquid than - say - melted Cheddar... But it makes no clear sense to me. Perhaps a cook can help us out...

    b

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    #3

    Re: thinly

    Thanks a lot for your reply. Yes he's a native speaker of English. First, i thought he meant "it melts making a thin layer on the pizza," they were making pizza. But then, I thought that he really talks a bout the "FRESH" mozzarella anad any kind either fresh or not, I think, would maelt making a thin layer. So I thought he might mean (It melts quickly) although there is no clue for that grammatically :(

    I'm waiting for any suggestions.

    Thanks

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    #4

    Re: thinly

    It could be that the mozzarella melts thinly or not thick. "Thinly" is the adverb of "melts".
    .
    Oh and yes it is an adverb of thin... but what I meant is that "thinly" modifies "melts".
    Last edited by Tepal; 21-Apr-2010 at 18:10.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: thinly

    Quote Originally Posted by Tepal View Post
    It could be that the mozzarella melts thinly or not thick. "Thinly" is the adverb of "melts".
    I'm afraid this makes no sense to me. 'Thinly' is the adverb of 'thin', isn't it?

    b

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