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  1. RoseSpring's Avatar
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    #1

    Bridging the breach!

    Bridging the breach.

    what does this expression mean?

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    #2

    Re: Bridging the breach!

    Hi tasneemspring,

    Metaphorical speaking.

    The is a problem, misunderstanding, confrontation, difference of opinion, challenge, difficulty, adversity, hardship, setback, hitch, drawback, glitch, hindrance, obstruction, snag, impediment, barrier, etc.

    (A breach)

    And a solution or way out to it.

    (A Bridge)

    Regards,

    José Manuel Rosón Bravo

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Bridging the breach!

    Some people may be interested to notice that the word 'breach' is related (quite closely) to the word 'break' - although the vowel sounds are different: Breach | Define Breach at Dictionary.com

    b

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Bridging the breach!

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Some people may be interested to notice that the word 'breach' is related (quite closely) to the word 'break' - although the vowel sounds are different: Breach | Define Breach at Dictionary.com

    b
    PS - to make the association of the words clearer: early firearms had to be loaded down the barrel - it took several seconds, maybe even minutes, to do (using a 'ramrod' - which doesn't exist as an object in today's world, but lives on in the metaphor 'straight as a ramrod', or 'ramrod-straight'*). The British army won a great advantage when they started using the new Lee Enfield breach-loading rifles. The user would break the rifle open and load the ammunition into the breach.

    b
    *PPS This is like several other expressions, based on now-unused firearms technology. If you save an argument for later, judging that the time is not right to use it yet, you 'keep your powder dry' (that's the gun-powder that you had to keep dry before loading it down the muzzle of your firearm). If something makes a big showy effect but has little actual result it's a 'flash in the pan' (that's the pan that held the priming charge of gunpowder, going off with a phut and a flash but not causing an explosion in the barrel.) There are probably others... (Ones that come to mind don't relate specifically to old technology - for example, when you 'let someone have it with both barrels' you use every means at your disposal against them; but some modern guns have two barrels (I think...))
    Last edited by BobK; 01-Sep-2010 at 11:11. Reason: Added PPS

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    #5

    Re: Bridging the breach!

    The double-barreled shotgun is the inspiration for that phrase. It would allow you two shots before re-loading.

    Pocket-sized Derringers also commonly have two barrels.


  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Bridging the breach!

    I would have thought that bridging a breach was more related to a gap in a wall, as in "Once more into the breach, dear friends."

    Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #7

    Re: Bridging the breach!

    Quote Originally Posted by RoseSpring View Post
    Bridging the breach.

    what does this expression mean?
    I am not a teacher.
    according to me it means:
    Sorting out differences and misunderstandings.

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Bridging the breach!

    I was talking about etymology - showing the link between the two brea* words.

    b

  6. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Bridging the breach!

    You ALWAYS have such interesting things to add about the origins. It's something I look forward to reading!
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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