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    #1

    Hear you/ hear from you

    I watched a Chinese English news channel the other day. A reporter was doing a live coverage on an event. He would be back the next day to do the report again. So, at the end of the coverage, the anchorman said, ' Thank you. We look forward to hear from you again tomorrow.'

    I know he made a mistake not putting an -ing after 'hear' there. But is the phrase 'hearing from' good English in that case? Or, it should be 'look forward to hearing you again' instead ?

    My previous teacher said 'hear from a person' means 'receive a letter from a person'.

    Thank you.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Hear you/ hear from you

    Quote Originally Posted by jiaruchan View Post
    I watched a Chinese English news channel the other day. A reporter was doing a live coverage on an event. He would be back the next day to do the report again. So, at the end of the coverage, the anchorman said, ' Thank you. We look forward to hear from you again tomorrow.'

    I know he made a mistake not putting an -ing after 'hear' there. But is the phrase 'hearing from' good English in that case? Or, it should be 'look forward to hearing you again' instead ?

    My previous teacher said 'hear from a person' means 'receive a letter from a person'.

    Thank you.
    "hearing from you" is correct.
    "I look forward to seeing you" is colloquial, but "hearing you" is not.
    Receiving a letter is only one way of hearing from a person.

  2. yuriya's Avatar
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    #3

    Smile Re: Hear you/ hear from you

    Quote Originally Posted by jiaruchan View Post
    I watched a Chinese English news channel the other day. A reporter was doing a live coverage on an event. He would be back the next day to do the report again. So, at the end of the coverage, the anchorman said, ' Thank you. We look forward to hear from you again tomorrow.'

    I know he made a mistake not putting an -ing after 'hear' there. But is the phrase 'hearing from' good English in that case? Or, it should be 'look forward to hearing you again' instead ?

    My previous teacher said 'hear from a person' means 'receive a letter from a person'.

    Thank you.
    Hope this helps.
    Hear from :
    1) receive news from (one form of news can be a letter)
    2) hear about something from that person's perspective.

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