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    #1

    More strict or stricter?

    The latter is preferred; is the former ever acceptable in formal writing, not colloquially?

  1. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: More strict or stricter?

    **Neither a teacher nor a native speaker.**

    My favorite dictionary (dict.cc) says stricter exists.
    I don't see a reason why more strict should be better or even correct.

    It's a (not an ) one-syllable word.
    [Strict] - [Strict-er] - [Strict-est]
    Compared to:
    [Diffi-cult] - more difficult - most difficult.

    I'm sorry if I confused this grammar rule, but I thought that was the important factor (if to use more/most or not.)

    P.S: Welcome to UsingEnglish

    Cheers!

  2. euncu's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: More strict or stricter?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    It's a (not an ) one-syllable word.
    [Strict] - [Strict-er] - [Strict-est]
    Unfortunately, according the way I say it, it has three syllables;
    Sɪ-tɪ-rɪct.

  3. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: More strict or stricter?

    Just check the speaker:

    dict.cc | strict |

    Then you will hear how they say it.
    Furthermore you can also test it with stricter and strictest

    P.S. I don't know if the rule is exactly how I said it.

    Cheers!

  4. The Majesty's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: More strict or stricter?

    I think is more strict the proper one

  5. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: More strict or stricter?

    Quote Originally Posted by Roman 36 View Post
    Hi

    I heard "more strict" the other day and it sounded a little odd.

    The rule goes that if you have a single syllable adjective, then add "er".

    As "strict" fits that description, I'd go with "stricter". That, of course, is not to say that in some parts of the US, Canada, or even the UK, "more strict" is being used and considered "natural".
    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Absolutely correct, whatever anyone may say to the contrary, the rule is as you say.(with the obvious exceptions of good, bad, far)
    https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/g...tml#post427202

    -------------------------

    It also seems that both can be used:
    Quote Originally Posted by VSPrasad View Post
    strict (comparative more strict, superlative most strict)

    strict - Wiktionary

    comparative stricter, superlative strictest

    strict definition - Dictionary - MSN Encarta

    https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/g...tml#post334494

    **Neither a teacher nor a native speaker.**

    Cheers!

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