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  1. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #1

    either

    Hello,
    Some weeks ago I learned the difference between too and either.
    We do not use too for negative sentences.

    Okay, but I have another question.
    Let's say we have two cars - car 1 is perfect and car 2 has many problems.

    Car 1 looks great and is very fast.
    Car 2 doesn't look great and is not very fast either.

    Car 2 doesn't look great and is also not very fast.
    Car 2 doesn't look great and is not very fast too.


    When I use either doesn't it refer to the previous sentence?
    In our case it would mean that car 1 looks bad and is slow too, same as car 2.
    I don't really believe either refers to sentence 1.

    Maybe my question is not very understandable, so just say it and I will try to explain it better

    Cheers!

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: either

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    Hello,
    Some weeks ago I learned the difference between too and either.
    We do not use too for negative sentences.

    Okay, but I have another question.
    Let's say we have two cars - car 1 is perfect and car 2 has many problems.

    Car 1 looks great and is very fast.
    Car 2 doesn't look great and is not very fast either.

    Car 2 doesn't look great and is also not very fast.
    Car 2 doesn't look great and is not very fast too.


    When I use either doesn't it refer to the previous sentence?
    In our case it would mean that car 1 looks bad and is slow too, same as car 2.
    I don't really believe either refers to sentence 1.

    Maybe my question is not very understandable, so just say it and I will try to explain it better

    Cheers!
    If Car 1 is perfect and doesn't share any attributes with Car 2, then you don't need "too" or "either".

    "Car 1 looks great and is really fast. Car 2 doesn't look great and it isn't very fast."

    The information about Car 2 doesn't relate to the information about Car 1 at all.

    As a sentence on its own, "Car 2 doesn't look great and it isn't very fast either" means the same as "Car 2 doesn't look great, nor is it very fast".

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    #3

    Re: either

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    As a sentence on its own, "Car 2 doesn't look great and it isn't very fast either" means the same as "Car 2 doesn't look great, nor is it very fast".
    Would it be correct to say "car 2 neither looks great, nor is very fast"

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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      • British English
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      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

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    #4

    Re: either

    Quote Originally Posted by ~Mav~ View Post
    Would it be correct to say "car 2 neither looks great, nor is very fast"
    Almost! "Car 2 neither looks great nor is it very fast."

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