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  1. #1
    massul is offline Newbie
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    Which one is commonly used in the spoken English?

    Dear sirs,
    My students tend to convey their massages like the way they express in their own language. It seems that they just translate their Indonesian utterances into English though using correct grammars. For examples, they prefer to say as follows:
    1. My stomach was sick so that I missed the speaking class. (Instead of: I got a stomachace so that ...)
    2. I am so sorry for not joining your class as my tire was flat on the way to the campus. (Instead of: ... because I got a flat tire on the way to the campus)
    3. My motor cycle key was lost somewhere in the parking area. (Instead of: I lost my motor cycle key in ....)
    4. This new hand phone was given by my father. (Instead of: My father gave me this new hand phone)
    5. and many others.

    Could you please advise me if the above statements are commonly expressed by English speaking people? Regarding the affirmative statements, do they often produce passive or active expression?

    I do appreciate your quick response.
    Regards,

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: Which one is commonly used in the spoken English?

    None of them sound natural to me. In the first two, I would use 'I had' instead of 'I got'. I would say 'so I missed' not 'so that I missed' as 'so that' implies that I became sick in order to miss the class. (British English speaker)

  3. #3
    massul is offline Newbie
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    Re: Which one is commonly used in the spoken English?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    None of them sound natural to me. In the first two, I would use 'I had' instead of 'I got'. I would say 'so I missed' not 'so that I missed' as 'so that' implies that I became sick in order to miss the class. (British English speaker)
    Hi Tdol, many thanks for ur corrections. I will then use 'so' i/o 'so that' in that sentence. However, as far as I know, British English (BE) use 'have' while American English (AE) use 'have got'. Therefore, you would use 'I had a stomachache ...' as you are BE speaker. In the AE the sentence would read 'I had got a stomachache ...'. In the spoken English it will be reduced to be 'I got a stomachache ...'. Am I wrong?

  4. #4
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Re: Which one is commonly used in the spoken English?

    American here: I had a stomachache yesterday.
    I have a headache today OR I've got a headache today.

    I would never say "I had got" a headache yesterday. (We also say "had gotten" but not with a headache.)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. #5
    tedtmc is offline Key Member
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    Re: Which one is commonly used in the spoken English?

    Headache is OK but stomach-ache is hyphenated.

    not a teacher

  6. #6
    Barb_D's Avatar
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    Re: Which one is commonly used in the spoken English?

    My dictionary lists it as one word: Stomachache - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary

    But in truth, usually I say "Ugh. My stomach hurts!"
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  7. #7
    tedtmc is offline Key Member
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    Re: Which one is commonly used in the spoken English?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    My dictionary lists it as one word: Stomachache - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary

    But in truth, usually I say "Ugh. My stomach hurts!"
    Oh, mine 'has got' a hyphen.

  8. #8
    Barb_D's Avatar
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    Re: Which one is commonly used in the spoken English?

    If I'd gotten yours off the shelf, I'd have had a different answer!
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  9. #9
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Re: Which one is commonly used in the spoken English?

    Quote Originally Posted by massul View Post
    Hi Tdol, many thanks for your corrections. I will then use 'so' i/o [?] 'so that' in that sentence. However, as far as I know, British English (BrE) use 'have' while American English (AmE) use 'have got'. Therefore, you would use 'I had a stomachache ...' as you are BE speaker. In the AE the sentence would read 'I had got a stomachache ...'. In the spoken English it will be reduced to be 'I got a stomachache ...'. Am I wrong?
    Hi massul,
    I wouldn't bother correcting you if you weren't an English teacher.
    Would you consider using AmE and BrE instead of AE and BE?
    AE can mean Australian English, American English, Aboriginal English. BE can mean Bermudan English, Barbados English etc.
    Experts in World Englishes, such as David Crystal use AmE and BrE. These terms have a fine pedigree and are more descriptive when writing to an international readership.

  10. #10
    massul is offline Newbie
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    Re: Which one is commonly used in the spoken English?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Hi massul,
    I wouldn't bother correcting you if you weren't an English teacher.
    Would you consider using AmE and BrE instead of AE and BE?
    AE can mean Australian English, American English, Aboriginal English. BE can mean Bermudan English, Barbados English etc.
    Experts in World Englishes, such as David Crystal use AmE and BrE. These terms have a fine pedigree and are more descriptive when writing to an international readership.
    Hi Raymott,
    Ups! Before abbreviating those two BE and AE in my previous thread, I had 'fortunately' written their full words. Therefore, I hope my readers will understand what BE and AE stand for. Anyway, I agree to use AmE and BrE later on as they surely show more descriptive.
    Thank you

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