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    #1

    'Therefore' followed by 'this is why'

    Is it correct to say ' therefore, this is why I chose to live my life this way'.
    Can the word 'Therefore' be followed by 'this is why'?

  1. #2

    Re: 'Therefore' followed by 'this is why'

    If you have just explained a reason for something, you can follow up with a sentence, starting with "This is why ....". Eg. I needed to get to work quickly. This is why I decided to skip my breakfast.

    If you now start to debate the reasons for reaching this conclusion you could contruct a sentence starting "Therefor, this is why...".

    So usually we don't do this.

    You knew that didn't you? I knew that you knew that. I knew you knew I knew that . No, I didn't know that you knew that I knew that ........... (Ad infinitum)

    It's English Jim - But not as we know it.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: 'Therefore' followed by 'this is why'

    Note that the word 'therefore' (stressed on the first syllable) has a final e. Confusingly there is also a word 'therefor', stressed on the second syllable', that means 'for that thing' *- almost exactly the opposite, in some contexts:

    'A, therefore B' -> B happened because of A, or 'B. The reason therefor was A.'

    To avoid confusion, people have let the second one fall out of use. (Online Etymology Dictionary )

    b
    PS This mirrors all the other 'there + preposition' words, such as thereat, therein, thereafter, thereupon... (all of which are fairly obscure, and can sensibly be ignored for most exams )
    Last edited by BobK; 30-Apr-2010 at 17:40. Reason: PS added

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    #4

    Re: 'Therefore' followed by 'this is why'

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Note that the word 'therefore' (stressed on the first syllable) has a final e. Confusingly there is also a word 'therefor', stressed on the second syllable', that means 'for that thing' *- almost exactly the opposite, in some contexts:

    'A, therefore B' -> B happened because of A, or 'B. The reason therefor was A.'

    To avoid confusion, people have let the second one fall out of use. (Online Etymology Dictionary )

    b
    PS This mirrors all the other 'there + preposition' words, such as thereat, therein, thereafter, thereupon... (all of which are fairly obscure, and can sensibly be ignored for most exams )


    Ok, thanks. I take it that it IS correct to say 'Therefore, this is why I chose to live my life this way' then.

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    #5

    Re: 'Therefore' followed by 'this is why'

    Quote Originally Posted by Agnes View Post
    Ok, thanks. I take it that it IS correct to say 'Therefore, this is why I chose to live my life this way' then.
    I have to disagree. "Therefore" and "this is why" express the same thing, namely, the reason why you chose to live your life a certain way. It seems redundant to use both.

    "Yesterday I didn't work out. That's why I went to the gym today."

    Would you really say, "Therefore, that's why I went to the gym today."? I wouldn't. I'd use either "therefore" or "that's why," but not both.

    NOT A TEACHER.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: 'Therefore' followed by 'this is why'

    Absoutely. It's not ungrammatical, but pleonastic.

    b

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