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  1. Unregistered
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    #1

    To and To me

    Can anyone explain the usage difference between:

    "She advised us not to go there"

    and

    "He explained to us the problem"

    Why not: "She advised to us not to go there"


    Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: To and To me

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    Why not: "She advised to us not to go there"
    You always say, 'you advise somebody', not 'you advise to somebody'

    'Advise' means 'to give counsel to'.

    So, you don't need another 'to'.

    Other examples:

    You recommend to somebody (with 'to')
    You suggest to somebody (with 'to')
    You remind somebody (without 'to')
    You encourage somebody (without 'to')

    not a teacher

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: To and To me

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    Can anyone explain the usage difference between:

    "She advised us not to go there"

    and

    "He explained to us the problem"

    Why not: "She advised to us not to go there"


    Thanks.
    As the previous poster said, you don't "advise to someone".

    Also: "He explained the problem to us", not "He explained to us the problem". In this context, you would put the object between "explained" and "to us".

    She explained it to me.
    They will explain the situation to us next week.
    I want you to explain the whole thing to me.

    (However: I explained to him THAT there was a problem.)

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: To and To me

    ... and as for the meaning, 'Don't go there' can mean two basic things - the obvious physical meaning ('Rwanda is dangerous. Don't go there'), and the metaphorical meaning 'Don't discuss that'. In this second meaning, it often takes an understated form without the imperative - 'Believe me, you don't want to go there!'

    The idea of using 'go' to mean 'pursue a line of argument' is not uncommon. It's often used in court-room dramas - 'Where is the Prosecution going with this line of questioning?'

    b

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