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    #1

    F***break is an English word?

    Hi Teachers,

    I found out the word "Fuckbreak" in some Eng to Asian language dictionaries, but I can't find this word in Eng to Eng dictionaries, I was wondering if the word of "Fuckbreak" exists in the English world? Please advise.

    W

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    re: F***break is an English word?

    That's weird - I just answered this but my post didn't post.

    I've never seen this word, heard this word, or used this word.

    You do realize that the "f-word" is among the most offensive in English, right? Be very, VERY careful who you use this word around.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #3

    re: F***break is an English word?

    Hello Willaimyth,
    Barb's right about the offensiveness of this word in almost all its uses despite its popularity among all levels of society including US presidents, politicians, generals, movie stars, and high ranking officials. On another level, we can all take different kinds of breaks or timeouts e.g. muffin or donut break or a hamburger break or a beer break. The list is endless so there is no reason for the word you quoted to be in any reputable English dictionary and I'm glad it isn't. I'm going to take a break right now and have a shower.

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    #4

    re: F***break is an English word?

    It is in Urban Dictionary, but in the definition, it is written as two words. It's just as Bsd51 says- a break or timeout rather than any sort of special meaning. I have never heard it used in the UK.

    BTW Given that many people do find such words offensive, could you please use some *** in the titles. There's nothing wrong with discussing slang but some people would prefer not to see the words in the titles, especially as people do use the site in schools. That way they aren't offended and you can start a discusion. Thanks.

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    #5

    Re: F***break is an English word?

    Quote Originally Posted by Williamyh View Post
    Hi Teachers,

    I found out the word "Fuckbreak" in some Eng to Asian language dictionaries, but I can't find this word in Eng to Eng dictionaries, I was wondering if the word of "Fuckbreak" exists in the English world? Please advise.

    W
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Good morning, Williamyh.

    (1) As the other posters have told you, this is NOT a word used in polite society.

    (2) Here in the United States, it is still considered so shocking that it may not be said on regular television programs or on any radio program.

    (3) Some people say it by NOT saying it.

    (a) For example, you may not say: Give me a *****ing break , will you?

    (i) So some people use a word that SOUNDS something like it.

    (a) Usually people will not get into trouble if they say:

    Give me a frigging break, will you? (But even that is not considered nice speech because people know what word you really mean. Your teachers would NOT be happy if you said it!!!)

    (4) The bottom line:

    Words such as **** should not be used on a regular basis. If they are, they then lose their value.

    Perhaps there are occasions that call for the use of ****. Then when you use it, it will be very powerful because people know that you are not the kind of person who uses that word on a regular basis.

    There are some people who use that word so often that no one pays attention to them anymore. They are just considered vulgar people.

    Have a nice day!

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