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    #1

    confusion

    I can not identify the different between have + v-pp and have + being + v-pp. Could somebody give me a example?

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: confusion

    Quote Originally Posted by Claradai View Post
    I can not identify the different between have + v-pp and have + being + v-pp. Could somebody give me a example?
    I'm not sure what you mean.

    Have + v-pp (I assume this is verb - past participle) would be :

    I have done my homework.
    You have cooked dinner 3 times this week.
    He has spent 100 on clothes today.

    Have + being + v-pp doesn't make any sense. Have + been + v+ing might be what you mean:

    I have been feeling very tired this month.
    He has been waiting several days for his letter to arrive.
    They have been stealing food from their neighbours.

    Have + being + v-pp wouldn't work. You would end up with "I have being waited......" or something!

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    #3

    Re: confusion

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I'm not sure what you mean.

    Have + v-pp (I assume this is verb - past participle) would be :

    I have done my homework.
    You have cooked dinner 3 times this week.
    He has spent 100 on clothes today.

    Have + being + v-pp doesn't make any sense. Have + been + v+ing might be what you mean:

    I have been feeling very tired this month.
    He has been waiting several days for his letter to arrive.
    They have been stealing food from their neighbours.

    Have + being + v-pp wouldn't work. You would end up with "I have being waited......" or something!
    Thank you. May I ask what different between had + v-pp and have + v-pp .

    Have + being + v-pp
    We had been ordering from another supplier for three months by the time James made his offer.

    We had ordered from another supplier for three months by the time James made his offer.

    I want to know the different between two of sentences.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: confusion

    Quote Originally Posted by Claradai View Post
    Thank you. May I ask what different between had + v-pp and have + v-pp .

    Have + being + v-pp
    We had been ordering from another supplier for three months by the time James made his offer.

    We had ordered from another supplier for three months by the time James made his offer.

    I want to know the different between two of sentences.
    You're not asking a clear question.
    You ask the difference between "had + vpp" and "have + v-pp."
    Then you say "Have + being + past participle".
    Then you give an example sentence with "Had + been + present participle". If you can't discriminate between these words, any explanation might be pointless.
    Also, you need to make clear whether 'v-pp' mean the present or the past participle.

    There's a lot of related grammar that you could be asking about, so I won't guess. Why not try to help us by writing a consistent question with an example?

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    #5

    Smile Re: confusion

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    You're not asking a clear question.
    You ask the difference between "had + vpp" and "have + v-pp."
    Then you say "Have + being + past participle".
    Then you give an example sentence with "Had + been + present participle". If you can't discriminate between these words, any explanation might be pointless.
    Also, you need to make clear whether 'v-pp' mean the present or the past participle.

    There's a lot of related grammar that you could be asking about, so I won't guess. Why not try to help us by writing a consistent question with an example?
    Sorry, in fact, I ask two questions.
    1.difference between "had + vpp" and "have + v-pp."
    2.
    the different between two of sentences

    We had been ordering from another supplier for three months by the time James made his offer.

    We had ordered from another supplier for three months by the time James made his offer.

    My logic is not good,so I just write down what I think, but ignore that whether people understand what I mean or not.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: confusion

    Quote Originally Posted by Claradai View Post
    Sorry, in fact, I ask two questions.
    1.difference between "had + vpp" and "have + v-pp."
    I'll assume you mean past participle by vpp, v-pp.
    have + vpp is the present perfect tense.
    "I have finished my homework."

    had + vpp is the past perfect tense.
    "I had finished my homework before I turned on the TV."
    2.
    the different between two of sentences

    We had been ordering from another supplier for three months by the time James made his offer.
    This is the past perfect continuous tense.
    "For a period of time before something happened (James making the offer), we had been doing something."
    We had ordered from another supplier for three months by the time James made his offer.
    This is the past perfect tense.
    This is similar in meaning in this case, but it's not expressed continuously.
    "For a period of time before something happened (James making the offer), we had done something."

    My logic is not good,so I just write down what I think, but ignore that whether people understand what I mean or not.
    That's sad. Is this a neurological condition, or do you just not bother about whether others understand you?
    Either way, I think it's something you could possibly work on, since good communication does involve using some empathy towards others'
    perceptions. In any case, I think you can make yourself more clear when you are asked to, so you shouldn't lose hope.
    R.

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