Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    smk is offline Junior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Tagalog
      • Home Country:
      • Philippines
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    82

    waggle

    Am I using the word "waggle" correctly in the sentence below?

    I usually waggle my toothbrush under cold water before putting toothpaste on it.

    If not, what is a better word(s) to describe wetting a toothbrush prior to applying toothpaste on it?

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    74,131

    Re: waggle

    Waggle implies (side-to-side) movement, so it doesn't really give that meaning to me. I'd use use 'hold it under the tap'

  3. #3
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    61,335

    Re: waggle

    Quote Originally Posted by smk View Post
    Am I using the word "waggle" correctly in the sentence below?

    I usually waggle my toothbrush under cold water before putting toothpaste on it.

    If not, what is a better word(s) to describe wetting a toothbrush prior to applying toothpaste on it?

    Thanks in advance!
    In the UK, at least, I would say that I "run my toothbrush under the tap".

    Waggle is usually something you do with a part of your body - you waggle your head, your finger, your foot.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •