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  1. #1
    smk is offline Junior Member
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    lord it over...

    What does this phrase mean?

    "But hell if Iím going to let you lord it over me from eternity."

  2. #2
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    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Re: lord it over...

    I'm not going to allow you to act in a superior manner to me forever. I won't let you act as though you are better/smarter/etc. than me.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. #3
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Re: lord it over...

    The 'hell if I'm going to' makes it a bit more insistent and heartfelt, I think

    b

  4. #4
    smk is offline Junior Member
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    Re: lord it over...

    Thank you! However, where exactly does, "lord it over from eternity", come from. I googled it and didn't come up with very much.

  5. #5
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    Smile Re: lord it over...

    Quote Originally Posted by smk View Post
    Thank you! However, where exactly does, "lord it over from eternity", come from. I googled it and didn't come up with very much.
    "For (all) eternity makes more sense to me than from eternity.

  6. #6
    Barb_D's Avatar
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    Re: lord it over...

    Quote Originally Posted by yuriya View Post
    "For (all) eternity makes more sense to me than from eternity.
    Indeed it does!
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  7. #7
    BobK's Avatar
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    Re: lord it over...

    'From eternity' doesn't make any sense in this context (as the speaker is talking about future behaviour). I've met 'from all eternity' - in a Victorian hymn, I think. That sense is more often rendered now by the idiom 'from time immemorial'.

    b

  8. #8
    smk is offline Junior Member
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    Re: lord it over...

    I agree that "for" makes more sense than "from" at least in this context, so in that light would it be safe to assume that the author of the sentence just made a typo? And, would "from" make sense out of context (i.e. can this idiom be used to express a thought in another situation perhaps)? Or is the word "from" just wrong?

    Thanks!!

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