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  1. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #1

    Adverbs, my final lesson?

    Hello guys,
    I've been trying to master the adverbs.
    My biggest problem is their position.
    I'll try to give them a perfect position.
    (I'm sorry if my examples are very poor, but examples are one of my weak points.)
    He insulted an admin directly after getting warned.
    Unfortunately, I don't have time yet.
    We tried to quickly work, but it was too quickly, so we broke it completely.
    We tried to work quickly, but it was too quickly, so we broke it completely. (For British English)
    He was often missing, that's why we threw him fast out of the clan.
    This person is now permanently banned on our servers.
    However, such a ban can be easily bypassed.
    Yesterday, I wrote a tutorial how to fully protect their own files.
    Yesterday, I wrote a tutorial how to protect fully their own files.
    (For British English)
    He definitely has no idea at all.
    We have been humiliatingly defeated, although we gave our best.
    You have fully the right to park your car here.

    We need to drive more carefully.
    She speaks English very well.
    His presence affects our mood badly.
    He constantly comes too late to work.

    I really hope that most of the sentences are correct
    Adverbs are a tough topic, but I don't give up quickly.

    Cheers!

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Adverbs, my final lesson?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    Hello guys,
    I've been trying to master the adverbs.
    My biggest problem is their position.
    I'll try to give them a perfect position.
    (I'm sorry if my examples are very poor, but examples are one of my weak points.)
    He insulted an admin directly after getting warned.
    Unfortunately, I don't have time yet.
    We tried to quickly work, but it was too quickly, so we broke it completely.
    This doesn't work for me. Is there really a non-BrE difference here?
    You can say, "We tried to quickly work out the answer".

    We tried to work quickly, but it was too quickly, so we broke it completely. (For British English)
    He was often missing; that's why we threw him fast out of the clan.
    No. "Quickly" would work here. "Fast" would need to be at the end. "They threw him out fast."

    This person is now permanently banned on our servers.
    However, such a ban can be easily bypassed.
    Yesterday, I wrote a tutorial on/about how to fully protect their own files.
    Yesterday, I wrote a tutorial how to protect fully their own files.
    (For British English) ? You seem to be assuming that BrE doesn't allow a split infinitive. Or is there some other principle here?
    Anyhow, this example is correct, but the previous one is better.

    He definitely has no idea at all.
    We have been humiliatingly defeated, although we gave our best.
    You have fully the right to park your car here.

    No, but the problem is with the expression, not the placement.


    We need to drive more carefully.
    She speaks English very well.
    His presence affects our mood badly. Yes, or "... badly affects our mood"

    He constantly comes too late to work.


    I really hope that most of the sentences are correct
    Adverbs are a tough topic, but I don't give up quickly.

    Cheers!
    They are mostly correct.

  3. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Adverbs, my final lesson?

    Hello Raymott and thank you for your reply

    Once I created a thread about "How to + adverb" and TheParser told me it's fully normal to allow a split infinitive in American English.
    I thought Britons dislike such a rule...
    His presence affects our mood badly. Yes, or "... badly affects our mood"
    Okay, but:
    He badly affects our mood.
    I think this would be not good, would it?

    Cheers!



  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Adverbs, my final lesson?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    Hello Raymott and thank you for your reply

    Once I created a thread about "How to + adverb" and TheParser told me it's fully normal to allow a split infinitive in American English.
    I thought Britons dislike such a rule...
    Maybe 80 years ago, they might have.

    His presence affects our mood badly. Yes, or "... badly affects our mood"
    Okay, but:
    He badly affects our mood.
    I think this would be not good, would it?
    It's acceptable, but "He affects our mood badly" is better.
    Cheers!

    I think misplaced adverbs are the most common error of speaking that native Germans who are fluent in English make.
    I was watching a German-Australian CEO of a large Australian company talking on TV a few nights ago. Apart from his slight accent and the occasional misplaced adverb, his English was perfect.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Adverbs, my final lesson?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    Hello Raymott and thank you for your reply

    Once I created a thread about "How to + adverb" and TheParser told me it's fully normal to allow a split infinitive in American English.
    I thought Britons dislike such a rule...
    His presence affects our mood badly. Yes, or "... badly affects our mood"
    Okay, but:
    He badly affects our mood.
    I think this would be not good, would it?

    Cheers!


    Bear in mind that "he badly affects" is not a split infinitive. "To badly affect" would be. It is that which many grammarians have a problem with. One of the most famous examples of this is in the spoken introduction to the original Star Trek series, which included the phrase "to boldly go". It has been quoted many times as an example of "bad" English. However, as you can see from the link below, as far back as 1998, the compilers of the Oxford English Dictionary decided that there was no problem with split infinitives.

    BBC News | UK | 'To boldly go' gets green light

  6. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Adverbs, my final lesson?

    Thanks

    @emsr2d2:
    I'm sorry, I forgot to put a blank line there.
    I thought Britons dislike such a rule...

    (The following had nothing to do with the previous thing )

    His presence affects our mood badly. Yes, or "... badly affects our mood"

  7. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Adverbs, my final lesson?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Bear in mind that "he badly affects" is not a split infinitive. "To badly affect" would be. It is that which many grammarians have a problem with. One of the most famous examples of this is in the spoken introduction to the original Star Trek series, which included the phrase "to boldly go". It has been quoted many times as an example of "bad" English. However, as you can see from the link below, as far back as 1998, the compilers of the Oxford English Dictionary decided that there was no problem with split infinitives.

    BBC News | UK | 'To boldly go' gets green light
    "As far back as 1998"? 1998 was yesterday!

  8. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Adverbs, my final lesson?

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    "As far back as 1998"? 1998 was yesterday!
    Ha ha! Well, I was surprised to find that it was 12 years ago! I thought the split infinitive argument had only been resolved in the last 2 or 3 years!

  9. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Adverbs, my final lesson?

    Hello guys.
    Thanks for your replies, by the way

    I would like to try to understand this rule better:
    Let's take these example sentences:
    1. He insulted an admin directly, and was banned.
    2. After he
    directly insulted an admin (directly), he was banned.
    3. I was there when he
    directly insulted the admin (directly).

    Now my question:
    To 1. I understand that it sounds weird to put the directly after the He.
    To 2. I think putting directly after he is equally good.
    To 3. To me "he directly" sounds best here.

    1. He affects these forums badly.
    2. Yes, it's true that he badly affects these forums (badly).


    My explanations:
    I think such adverbs like directly, badly etc. should not be the 2nd word of a sentence.
    If a sentence is long, like example 2 and 3, it does not sound bad to me.

    1st word, adverb, 3rd word -> not good.
    1st word, 2nd word, adverb, 4th word -> better.
    (I'm not talking about adverbs like "Unfortunately" "Often" etc.)

    I hope that was understandable...

    Cheers!

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