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    #1

    angrier or more angry

    I had thought the comparative form of angry is "angrier" until I came across an article in which "more angry" is used. Are they both OK? Or one is more informally used? Looking forward to your help.

  1. nedira's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: angrier or more angry

    Both are fine.

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    #3

    Re: angrier or more angry

    **Neither a teacher nor a native speaker.**

    I'm sorry, but I don't see a reason why "more angry" should be right.
    If it were an adverb, I would accept it, but it's only a one-syllable adjective.
    angry -> angrier -> angriest
    hungry -> hungrier -> hungriest.
    fast -> faster -> fastest

    difficult -> more difficult -> most difficult
    (Because it's diffi-cult).

    Of course everyone will understand you if you say "more angry", but I doubt it would let you look good.

    Cheers!

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    #4

    Re: angrier or more angry

    Quote Originally Posted by chance22 View Post
    I had thought the comparative form of angry is "angrier" until I came across an article in which "more angry" is used. Are they both OK? Or one is more informally used? Looking forward to your help.
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Good afternoon, Chance22.

    (1) I believe that speakers and writers often have a choice between using " -er " or "more."

    (2) Sometimes it seems to depend on the sound of the adjective or the rhythm of the whole sentence.

    (a) Tom is famouser/ more famous than Sue.

    (i) I think most people prefer the sound of "more famous."

    (3) Sometimes -- as you so correctly said -- it depends on how formal you want to be.

    (a) One book gives this example:

    (i) Tom is cleverer than Sue = informal.

    (ii) Tom is more clever than Sue =formal.

    (4) Another book reminds us that sometimes you CANNOT use -er.

    (a) When you compare two descriptions of a person, you need "more":

    (i) Tom is more lazy than stupid.

    (a) You CANNOT say: Tom is lazier than stupid.

    Therefore, I think that you would have to say:

    I was more angry than embarrassed. (NOT: I was angrier than embarrassed.)

    (5) Sometimes it is your choice. You may choose the one that sounds "smoother" to your ears:

    (a) Don't say that to Tom. It will only make him angrier/ more angry.

    Which one do you prefer? (I prefer "angrier")

    (b) Why are you so calm and quiet? I think that you should get angrier/ more angry about what they did to you.

    Which one do you prefer? (I prefer "more angry")

    Have a nice day!

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    #5

    Re: angrier or more angry

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    **Neither a teacher nor a native speaker.**

    I'm sorry, but I don't see a reason why "more angry" should be right.
    If it were an adverb, I would accept it, but it's only a one-syllable adjective.
    angry -> angrier -> angriest
    hungry -> hungrier -> hungriest.
    fast -> faster -> fastest

    difficult -> more difficult -> most difficult
    (Because it's diffi-cult).

    Of course everyone will understand you if you say "more angry", but I doubt it would let you look good.

    Cheers!
    Angry is, in fact, a two-syllable adjective!!!

    Anyway, I think it depends somewhat on context. I would say "He was much angrier than her" but "As the day wore on, I became more and more angry".

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    #6

    Re: angrier or more angry

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Angry is, in fact, a two-syllable adjective!!!
    Then difficult would be a three-syllable word, which is wrong
    It's diffi-cult, not dif-fi-cult.
    So it's also hungry, and not hung-ry.
    (And of course angry, not ang-ry).

    Cheers!

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    #7

    Re: angrier or more angry

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    Then difficult would be a three-syllable word, which is wrong
    It's diffi-cult, not dif-fi-cult.
    So it's also hungry, and not hung-ry.
    (And of course angry, not ang-ry).

    Cheers!
    I'm afraid not. You are wrong on all counts. I'm not sure if someone has explained the meaning of "syllables" wrongly to you at some point.

    Angry and hungry both have 2 syllables (An-gry and hun-gry)
    Difficult does indeed have 3 syllables (Di-ffi-cult).

    One syllable words have literally just one sound that you make all in one go:

    Fast
    Are
    Am
    Car
    Bus
    Tip
    All

    Etc etc, I could go on for hours.

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    #8

    Re: angrier or more angry

    I don't know, emsr2d2.
    Look:
    There are plenty of such words.
    happy -> happier -> happiest
    lucky -> luckier -> luckiest
    (I bet you'll find them in every dictionary.)
    hungry, angry etc. simply belong to them.
    Adjectives

    Maybe we take this "one-syllable" rule too accurate.
    Or maybe it's not the only rule?

    About "more angry":
    Yes, I think it depends on context.
    "Tom is more angry than stupid" - similar to Parser's version.
    (But to be honest: I could not explain it very well.)

    Cheers!

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    #9

    Re: angrier or more angry

    I was just about to say that syllable counts are equal to the number of vowels in a word before I actually checked my Oxford dictionary. Clearly, I've been in the wrong. As Nightmare85 illustrates, words ending in consonant + y (angry/lucky/happy etc) are in fact one syllable shorter than expected. I'm curious to hear what others in the know have to say about this.

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    #10

    Re: angrier or more angry

    I don't think there are hard and fast rules about this.
    I'd say use whichever word that sounds better to you in a sentence.
    Of course the long the word get, it becomes awkward to use the '-er'.
    Still, I've come across words like 'pleasanter'.

    not a teacher

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