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  1. #1
    Unregistered Guest

    Question

    I am little embrassed to ask this question but I don't know the correct form, so I need help please. My question is: Do you need a comma after "oh" in this sentence. The sentence is: Oh f**k, I forgot the donuts again.

    Is it acceptable to write it like this: Oh, f**k, I forgot the donuts again.

    Or both forms are correct?

  2. #2
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    I am little embrassed to ask this question but I don't know the correct form, so I need help please. My question is: Do you need a comma after "oh" in this sentence. The sentence is: Oh f**k, I forgot the donuts again.

    Is it acceptable to write it like this: Oh, f**k, I forgot the donuts again.

    Or both forms are correct?
    No, you don't need a comma. Most writers using the more polite expression, "Oh dear! I forgot ..." do not use a comma. You could consider an exclamation point and a new sentence.

  3. #3
    TheParser is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    I am little embrassed to ask this question but I don't know the correct form, so I need help please. My question is: Do you need a comma after "oh" in this sentence. The sentence is: Oh f**k, I forgot the donuts again.

    Is it acceptable to write it like this: Oh, f**k, I forgot the donuts again.

    Or both forms are correct?

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Good afternoon.

    (1) You have asked a very interesting question.

    (2) First, it would helpful if you did not use that naughty word.

    (a) If you are a young person, you have probably heard it a million times in movies, so I can understand why you think it is OK.

    (3) You could use other words such as "darn," "fudge," or "shoot." Those three words are used in place of similarly sounding "bad" words. For example, "darn" takes the place of "damn," which used to be a word that Americans could not say. It is not considered super bad nowadays. "Shoot" takes the place of a word that is still considered "bad" to say. So some people say, "Oh shoot! I forgot the donuts again."



    (4) Regarding "Oh dear," here in the United States many men do not use it because they feel it is not "masculine sounding" enough.

    (5) Regarding punctuation:

    (a) It does seem that most people in the United States use two ways:

    (i) Oh darn, I forgot the donuts again.

    (ii) Oh darn! I forgot the donuts again. (Stronger than (i) )

    (iii) Oh, darn! I forgot the donuts again.

    (a) Probably most people would not use a comma after "Oh," but there is

    no perfect "rule." If you use a comma, it is very difficult to say that you

    are "wrong." Maybe it means: Oh, darn it! In that case, you would be "correct" in using a comma after "oh."

    Have a nice day!

  4. #4
    mayita1usa's Avatar
    mayita1usa is offline Member
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    Re: Question

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    (3) You could use other words such as "darn," "fudge," or "shoot." Those three words are used in place of similarly sounding "bad" words. For example, "darn" takes the place of "damn," which used to be a word that Americans could not say. It is not considered super bad nowadays. "Shoot" takes the place of a word that is still considered "bad" to say. So some people say, "Oh shoot! I forgot the donuts again."
    A relatively new and popular substitute for the infamous f*word is frick... ("Fudge" is getting a bit old, don't you think?)

  5. #5
    TheParser is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Question

    Quote Originally Posted by mayita1usa View Post
    A relatively new and popular substitute for the infamous f*word is frick... ("Fudge" is getting a bit old, don't you think?)
    Thank you for your kind note.

    And thank you for the updated naughty word.

    Yes, "fudge" is VERY old -- as am I!!!

    Have a nice day!

  6. #6
    Abstract Idea is offline Key Member
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    Re: Question

    Oh, I see you are talking about Fornication Under Consent of the King?

    Talking more seriously it took me some time before figuring out that four-letter word does not really come from the acronym above but rather it is just a funny telling.
    It was (almost) like someone telling me Santa Claus does not exist.

    By the way this post is just to recall that the negative charge carried by swear/naughty words are not perceived the same way by native and non native speakers. Even when the non-native speaker knows exactly what the word means, or even when he or she has an advanced skill level on the language, it is much easier for him or her to pronounce/hear it than for the native.
    Last edited by Abstract Idea; 18-May-2010 at 20:43. Reason: changed "more serious" to "more seriously"

  7. #7
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Re: Question

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    By the way this post is just to recall that the negative charge carried by swear/naughty words are not perceived the same way by native and non native speakers. Even when the non-native speaker knows exactly what the word means, or even when he or she has an advanced skill level on the language, it is much easier for him or her to pronounce/hear it than for the native.
    That is why learners should take it seriously when native speakers indicate that this word is not acceptable in polite company, no matter how often they see it used in chat rooms and the like.

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