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  1. leke's Avatar
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    #1

    sign into vs. sign in to

    For example:
    This allows you to sign into Youtube on your phone.
    This allows you to sign in to Youtube on your phone.

    Which is correct? I think it's "sign in to" because "sign in" is a compound noun (I think that's what it is called) so you can't really mutate it by adding "to".

    Thanks.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: sign into vs. sign in to

    Quote Originally Posted by leke View Post
    For example:
    This allows you to sign into Youtube on your phone.
    This allows you to sign in to Youtube on your phone.

    Which is correct? I think it's "sign in to" because "sign in" is a compound noun (I think that's what it is called) so you can't really mutate it by adding "to".

    Thanks.
    "to sign in" is a phrasal verb.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: sign into vs. sign in to

    Quote Originally Posted by leke View Post
    For example:
    This allows you to sign into Youtube on your phone.
    This allows you to sign in to Youtube on your phone.

    Which is correct? I think it's "sign in to" because "sign in" is a compound noun (I think that's what it is called) so you can't really mutate it by adding "to".

    Thanks.
    As bhaisahab said, "to sign in" is a phrasal verb and can be used alone.

    "Please sign in."

    However, if you want to specify exactly where that should happen:

    Please sign in to your account.
    Please sign in on the sheet of paper at the reception desk.
    Please sign in at the reception desk before you enter the building.

  4. leke's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: sign into vs. sign in to

    Ah, a phrasal verb. Thanks for the info. I've never heard of that one :)

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