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    #1

    Him/His

    "I have a rookie card of him." (This means that the card features him.)

    "I have a rookie card of his." (This means that the card belongs to him.)

    Are the explanations in the parentheses correct?

    Thanks.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Him/His

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    "I have a rookie card of him." (This means that the card features him.)

    "I have a rookie card of his." (This means that the card belongs to him.)

    Are the explanations in the parentheses correct?

    Thanks.
    Correct.

  2. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Him/His

    **Neither a teacher nor a native speaker.**

    Just a question:
    Would it not be better to replace 2. with:
    "I have a rookie card from him."

    I have never heard "of his".
    (Of course I believe it's correct, but it sounds very strange to me.)

    Cheers!

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    #4

    Re: Him/His

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    **Neither a teacher nor a native speaker.**

    Just a question:
    Would it not be better to replace 2. with:
    "I have a rookie card from him."

    I have never heard "of his".
    (Of course I believe it's correct, but it sounds very strange to me.)

    Cheers!
    NOT A TEACHER.

    "Of his" sounds good and such a construction is common in English. But one could say what you suggested, too.

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    #5

    Re: Him/His

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    **Neither a teacher nor a native speaker.**

    Just a question:
    Would it not be better to replace 2. with:
    "I have a rookie card from him."

    I have never heard "of his".
    (Of course I believe it's correct, but it sounds very strange to me.)

    Cheers!
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Good morning, Nightmare.

    (1) Oh, yes, native speakers often use "of mine, yours, his, hers, ours, theirs" to show "possession."

    I want you to meet a friend of mine. (My friend)

    May I borrow a book of yours? (Your book)

    Is Sue a girlfriend of his? (His girlfriend)

    Is this a hat of hers? (Her hat)

    Everyone loves this country of ours. (Our country)

    Have you ever ridden in that private jet of theirs? (Their private jet)

    Have a nice day!

  3. euncu's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Him/His

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    **Neither a teacher nor a native speaker.**

    Just a question:
    Would it not be better to replace 2. with:
    "I have a rookie card from him."
    ***neither a teacher nor a native-speaker***

    The way you say means that the card was sent or handed by him.
    The original sentence doesn't indicate that. Maybe the one who owns the card bought it, or traded a friend his/her less favourite card for this card, or etc.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Him/His

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Good morning, Nightmare.

    (1) Oh, yes, native speakers often use "of mine, yours, his, hers, ours, theirs" to show "possession."

    I want you to meet a friend of mine. (My friend) - One of my friends.

    May I borrow a book of yours? (Your book) - One of your books.

    Is Sue a girlfriend of his? (His girlfriend) - One of his girlfriends.

    Is this a hat of hers? (Her hat) - One of her hats.

    Everyone loves this country of ours. (Our country) Agree.

    Have you ever ridden in that private jet of theirs? (Their private jet) Agree.

    Have a nice day!
    Bear in mind that if you use the indefinite article, as in examples 1-4 above, it does not suggest one single thing. May I borrow a book of yours? = May I borrow one of your books? BUT May I borrow that book of yours? = May I borrow your book (a specific one)?

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