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  1. 羡鱼-Xianyu's Avatar

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    #1

    Which one is correct?

    There is only enough spring water to supply the needs of the house, so we have to pump from the river for farm use.

    _____is only enough to supply the needs of the house.

    a. Water of the spring
    b. The water in spring
    c. The water from the spring
    d. Spring water
    e. Water from the spring

    Dear all,

    The right key to this question is C, but I am wondering why D and E are incorrect? To me, both D and E are also correct. Could you tell me which one works for you and explain why, please?

    Thanks in advance!

    Xianyu

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Which one is correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by 羡鱼-Xianyu View Post
    There is only enough spring water to supply the needs of the house, so we have to pump from the river for farm use.

    _____is only enough to supply the needs of the house.

    a. Water of the spring
    b. The water in spring
    c. The water from the spring
    d. Spring water
    e. Water from the spring

    Dear all,

    The right key to this question is C, but I am wondering why D and E are incorrect? To me, both D and E are also correct. Could you tell me which one works for you and explain why, please?

    Thanks in advance!

    Xianyu
    D and E aren't correct. They are about equal, and have the same problem.
    The sentence implicitly has 'water' in the position below:
    _____is only enough [water] to supply the needs of the house.
    You're talking about a quantity of water, and hence you must specify which water you are quantifying - the spring water, or the water from the spring.
    The sentence really means:
    The [amount of] spring water is only enough [water] to supply the needs of the house.

    You could say "Spring water is good for drinking", but not "Spring water is enough for drinking". In the first, you are referring to any spring water, or all spring water.
    In the second, you must be talking about some specific spring water, because you are able to quantify it.

  3. 羡鱼-Xianyu's Avatar

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    #3

    Re: Which one is correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    D and E aren't correct. They are about equal, and have the same problem.
    The sentence implicitly has 'water' in the position below:
    _____is only enough [water] to supply the needs of the house.
    You're talking about a quantity of water, and hence you must specify which water you are quantifying - the spring water, or the water from the spring.
    The sentence really means:
    The [amount of] spring water is only enough [water] to supply the needs of the house.

    You could say "Spring water is good for drinking", but not "Spring water is enough for drinking". In the first, you are referring to any spring water, or all spring water.
    In the second, you must be talking about some specific spring water, because you are able to quantify it.
    Hello, Raymott. Thank you for your useful help. Now I've got it, but I still have some troubles with definite and indefinite article. Would you mind giving me further help, please?

    Could tell me what are the differences between these following sentences?
    1) The refrigerators are useful during hot summer.
    2) The refrigerator is useful during hot summer.
    3) Refrigerators are useful during hot summer.
    4) A refrigerator is useful during hot summer.
    Last edited by 羡鱼-Xianyu; 21-May-2010 at 10:20.

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Which one is correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by 羡鱼-Xianyu View Post
    Hello, Raymott. Thank you for your useful help. Now I've got it, but I still have some troubles with definite and indefinite article. Would you mind giving me further help, please?

    Could tell me what are the differences between these following sentences?
    1) The refrigerators are useful during hot summer.
    You already know which refrigerators you're talking about. For example, you are inspecting somebody's butcher shop, and they say this to you.
    2) The refrigerator is useful during hot summer.
    There's only one of them. Or, you're talking about refrigerators in general.
    3) Refrigerators are useful during hot summer.
    You're talking about refrigerators in general. This is the most common way to say this.
    4) A refrigerator is useful during hot summer.
    You're talking about refrigerators in general, but the emphasis here is on the user. "For a grocery store, a refrigerator is useful during hot summer."
    There's some overlap in meaning and usage.
    R.

  5. 羡鱼-Xianyu's Avatar

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    #5

    Re: Which one is correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    There's some overlap in meaning and usage.
    R.
    Now I've got it. Thanks, I really appreciate for your further help!

    Have a nice day, Raymott.

  6. 羡鱼-Xianyu's Avatar

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    #6

    Re: Which one is correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    There's some overlap in meaning and usage.
    R.
    Hello, Raymott. I come back again with another question. LOL...

    After reading your notes, it seemed that I've already understood the use of 'the', but when I read another similar sentence, my mind became confused again.

    I know someone who always cuts sketches out from newspapers of model clothes that she would like to buy if she had the money.

    Is its use equal to 'The water from the spring'?
    ......if she had the amount of money?

    And does 'had money' mean 'had any money'? Am I right, Raymott?

    Excuse my troubling you again.





  7. Raymott's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Which one is correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by 羡鱼-Xianyu View Post
    Hello, Raymott. I come back again with another question. LOL...

    After reading your notes, it seemed that I've already understood the use of 'the', but when I read another similar sentence, my mind became confused again.

    I know someone who always cuts sketches out from newspapers of model clothes that she would like to buy if she had the money.

    Is its use equal to 'The water from the spring'?
    ......if she had the amount of money?
    Yes, but it might be better if I explain it differently:
    She has some money. She has enough to buy food, for example. But she doesn't have the money that buying model clothes would require. It's a specific amount of money that she doesn't have.

    Sometimes we even say, "She doesn't have that kind of money."
    The implication is that there is a difference between food-buying money and dress-buying money. But the difference is in the amount, or perhaps it's the difference between money-for-essentials and money-for-luxuries. She doesn't have the latter.

    And does 'had money' mean 'had any money'? Am I right, Raymott?
    In this case, no. She does have some money. So, it's wrong to say, "She doesn't have any money".
    It's correct to say, "She doesn't have money for luxuries. She doesn't have the money to buy those dresses."

    A: I'll sell you a dress for $400.
    B: Sorry, I don't have the money.

    This doesn't mean that B has no money. She doesn't have the [amount of] money asked for.

    Excuse my troubling you again.
    No problem.
    R.

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    #8

    Re: Which one is correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by 羡鱼-Xianyu View Post
    Hello, Raymott. Thank you for your useful help. Now I've got it, but I still have some troubles with definite and indefinite article. Would you mind giving me further help, please?

    Could tell me what are the differences between these following sentences?
    1)The refrigerators are useful during hot summer.
    2) The refrigerator is useful during hot summer.
    3) Refrigerators are useful during hot summer.
    4) A refrigerator is useful during hot summer.

    A)The definite article is sometimes used for objects and phenomena which have singular existence..eg the sun the moon etc..not the star.
    b)The definite article is also used with musical instruments..eg the piano
    c)The definite article could also be used for specifics...eg the river(a particular one in question)
    d)The definite article is also used with acronyms which cannot be appelled ie pronounced as a name.eg the English Premier League(epl) The BBC etc.Note:Acronyms that can be pronounced are treated like proper nouns..eg He was the president of NATO
    e)The definite article is also,sometimes,used with objects or things which serve purposes slightly more important than those they are conventionally designed to.eg The blanket may prove a reliable companion in a lonely desert.
    With regard to the above four sentences,I find sentence one a little too grandiose particularly for the pluralization ((The refrigerators )are useful during hot summer.)Since a single refrigerator can function exactly the way each of 100 refrigerators will,the pluralization is unnecessary.Sentence two is correct...see (e) above.Sentence 3 is a generally true statement while sentence 4 is theoretically correct.Therefore,IMO,only sentence 1 is wrong.

  9. Senior Member
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    #9

    Re: Which one is correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by rhapsomatrics View Post
    Therefore,IMO,only sentence 1 is wrong.
    Sentence 1 isn't wrong in the right context. Raymott's excellent first post on the 'refrigerator(s)' question says all you need to know.

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