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  1. Over the top's Avatar
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    #1

    for+gerund vs used to+infinitive

    Hello
    What is the difference between for+gerund and used to+infinitive
    This is a device for controlling the cursor.
    This is a device that is used to control the cursor.
    Thanks

  2. fighting spirit's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: for+gerund vs used to+infinitive

    It's the same, no difference.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: for+gerund vs used to+infinitive

    Quote Originally Posted by Over the top View Post
    Hello
    What is the difference between for+gerund and used to+infinitive
    This is a device for controlling the cursor.
    This is a device that is used to control the cursor.
    Thanks
    Well, those two mean the same.
    But "for verbing" doesn't always mean "that is used to verb", though it does tend to when the meaning is "for the purpose of".

    "for verbing" can mean "to be used as":
    "That dessert is for eating later." The dessert is used as food/as something to eat - it's not used to eat something.
    "That dessert is to be eaten later."
    * "That dessert is used to eat later." No.

    There are many examples where the verb is intransitive, and the infinitive construct doesn't work:
    Those shoes are for dancing. Yes.
    * Those shoes are to dance. No.
    Your mind is for thinking. Yes.
    * Your mind is to think.
    No.

    "for verbing" can mean "because one verbed":
    He punished me for cheating. Yes.
    * He punished me to cheat. No

    I'm sure there are other examples.

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