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    #1

    For £5000

    Hello!

    The vase was knocked down for £5000. (OALD)

    Is it possible to use ‘at’ instead of ‘for’ in the sentence above?

    Thanks in advance

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: For £5000

    Quote Originally Posted by Kazuo View Post
    Hello!

    The vase was knocked down for £5000. (OALD)

    Is it possible to use ‘at’ instead of ‘for’ in the sentence above?

    Thanks in advance
    I can't see any reason why not.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: For £5000

    I'm confused by the meaning of the sentence, regardless of whether you use "at" or "for".

    "The vase was knocked down for £5000" means to me that someone was paid £5000 to knock the vase to the ground! (Similar to "His wife was murdered for £10,000"!)

    "The vase was knocked down, at £5000" (note the comma) would mean that the vase was on sale at a reduced price, now £5,000.

    If the vase had previously been on sale at a higher price you can say "The vase was knocked down to £5,000".

    In order to use "for" I would have to change the sentence to "The vase was on sale for £5,000, a knock-down price".

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: For £5000

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I'm confused by the meaning of the sentence, regardless of whether you use "at" or "for".

    "The vase was knocked down for £5000" means to me that someone was paid £5000 to knock the vase to the ground! (Similar to "His wife was murdered for £10,000"!)

    "The vase was knocked down, at £5000" (note the comma) would mean that the vase was on sale at a reduced price, now £5,000.

    If the vase had previously been on sale at a higher price you can say "The vase was knocked down to £5,000".

    In order to use "for" I would have to change the sentence to "The vase was on sale for £5,000, a knock-down price".
    I believe "knocked down" is the technical term used when auctioneers knock their gavel to signify that bidding is over.
    In this case, I think 'at' and 'for' both work, but 'at' is part of the technical term - to knock something down at a certain price.

    knock-down: Definition from Answers.com

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: For £5000

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I believe "knocked down" is the technical term used when auctioneers knock their gavel to signify that bidding is over.
    In this case, I think 'at' and 'for' both work, but 'at' is part of the technical term - to knock something down at a certain price.

    knock-down: Definition from Answers.com
    Aha! In that case, I understand! Thanks.

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    #6

    Re: For £5000

    At works better for me than for as an auctioneer stops at that point.

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