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    #1

    weak / reduced form of 'with'

    Deal all

    this question is especially for native speaker

    Do you use the weak / reduced form of 'with' frequently when you speak fast

    Is it better for ESL student to speak by using weak form of modal verb to sound more naturally ?

    Is the weak form also commonly used by Australian and Briton ?
    Is the any difference in terms of weak form among native speakers fron US, UK and Australia ?

    Thanks a lot

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: weak / reduced form of 'with'

    Quote Originally Posted by duiter View Post
    Deal all

    this question is especially for native speaker

    Do you use the weak / reduced form of 'with' frequently when you speak fast

    Is it better for ESL student to speak by using weak form of modal verb to sound more naturally ?

    Is the weak form also commonly used by Australian and Briton ?
    Is the any difference in terms of weak form among native speakers fron US, UK and Australia ?

    Thanks a lot
    I don't know about anyone else, but I don't know what you mean. "With" only has one syllable, it would be hard to reduce it any further. Can you give an example?

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: weak / reduced form of 'with'

    Quote Originally Posted by duiter View Post
    Deal all

    this question is especially for native speaker

    Do you use the weak / reduced form of 'with' frequently when you speak fast
    All function words are given less stress, routinely, unless there's some reason to stress them. There's no weak form as such.
    Are you going with the others?
    /wɪθi:/ The θ is not released, but merges with the .

    Is it better for ESL student to speak by using weak form of modal verb to sound more naturally ?
    "You can go." It's common to pronounce 'can' as /kən/ rather than /kn/ here.
    You can go, but you don't have to.
    Here, /k:n/ is stressed and given it's full value, as is 'have'.
    It's OK for students to do this if it does sound more natural and they know what they're doing.

    Is the weak form also commonly used by Australian and Briton ?
    Yes, assuming that this is what you mean.
    Is the any difference in terms of weak form among native speakers fron US, UK and Australia ?
    Not significantly.
    Thanks a lot
    The term "weak form" isn't routinely used in English. It seems that it's a function of L1. If the L1, such as Japanese, gives full weight to all syllables, teachers of English to Japanese students might find the concept of a "weak form" useful. For students with L1s that use a similar variation of stress to English, it's not necessary.

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