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      • Native Language:
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      • South Korea
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    • Join Date: May 2010
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    #1

    more than / rather than

    Thank you for reading my question
    I got something curious I've never thought about
    While reading a grammar book.

    1. I love you more than him. (not to think of ambiguity)

    That's a good sentence, and I don't see anything unnatural.
    and 'I love more you than him' sounds strange.

    but how about the following sentence?

    2. I need money more than a car.

    I kinda think 'I need more money than a car' is more natural...
    There must be something different between two sentences...
    but I can't see it.

    but 'I need more money than a car' sounds like 'I need more money than before'

    I'm confused so much...

    which one of two sentences is correct? or both of them correct?

    please help me out of this haunting curiosity...



    and I found it out that 'rather than' should be stuck to each other
    except for 'would rather A than B', so never mind.
    Last edited by whsans; 27-May-2010 at 02:08.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
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      • Australia
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      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,103
    #2

    Re: more than / rather than

    Quote Originally Posted by whsans View Post
    1. I love you more than him. (not to think of ambiguity)
    It's unclear what you're saying. Do you mean you can see the ambiguity but that that is not your focus?

    That's a good sentence, and I don't see anything unnatural.
    and 'I love more you than him' sounds strange.
    It is strange.

    but how about the following sentence?

    2. I need money more than a car.
    This means, "I need money more than I need a car."
    "My need for money is greater than my need for a car."


    I kinda think 'I need more money than a car' is more natural...
    Well, it's not. That means "I need more money than a car needs."
    And since a car doesn't need money at all, it is a bad sentence.

    but 'I need more money than a car' sounds like 'I need more money than before'
    Then forget "I need more money than a car". It's wrong.
    "I need more money than before" = "I need more money than I did before"
    "I need more money than my sister" = "I need more money than my sister does." (My sister needs less money than I do.)

    R.

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