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  1. #1
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    To & For

    You are liable for the damage caused by your action.
    Could you explain why this sentence uses preposition for instead To?
    Do you have any good way to distinguish these prepositions above?

  2. #2
    albertino is offline Senior Member
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    Re: To & For

    Quote Originally Posted by hitinvo View Post
    You are liable for the damage caused by your action.
    Could you explain why this sentence uses preposition for instead To?
    Do you have any good way to distinguish these prepositions above?
    (Not a teacher.)
    "liable for something" means one is responsible by law.
    Is a parent liable for the wayward behaviour of his or her children?
    "liable to something" means one is subject to something.
    Offenders are liable to a fine for smoking in toilets.

  3. #3
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: To & For

    Liable to can mean likely to, often with something negative- liable to fail/explode etc.

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