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  1. Junior Member
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    #1

    Smile still have a riddle....

    Dear teachers,

    However, I still have a remaining riddle regarding short action in reduced relative clause. For instance:

    1. Many teachers attended the meeting yesterday
    2. They have decided to go on strike.

    Many teachers attending the meeting yesterday have decided to go on strike.

    is the above sentence right, especially the time reference?

    I would share any information with you all, I hope I can get your opinion as well.

    Thankful for your guidance.

    Thanks.

  2. fighting spirit's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: still have a riddle....

    Many teachers who attended the meeting yesterday decided to go on strike.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: still have a riddle....

    Quote Originally Posted by kl004535 View Post
    Dear teachers,

    However, I still have a remaining riddle regarding short action in reduced relative clause. For instance:
    ...
    You can't start a text with "however". It only has meaning if something comes before it.

  4. Junior Member
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    #4

    Smile Re: still have a riddle....

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    You can't start a text with "however". It only has meaning if something comes before it.
    Thanks for your advice. If I am not mistaken, I think you are a linguist based on your previous postings. Linguist is my dream. I hope I could be a linguist one day.

    Could I ask you a question regarding the Gerund?
    Since the gerunds are derived from verbs, so it also has perfect and continuous sense of verbs in the Gerund. (not many other languages have this feature)
    Therefore, do I have to care about the aspect of the gerund in my sentences?

    For example:

    1. Jane's being sexually assaulted has made quite an impact on her.
    (The gerund above suggests that Jane was sexually assaulted.)

    2. Jane's having been sexually assaulted made quite an impact on her.
    (The gerund above suggests that Jane had sexually been assaulted.)


    Actually, the aspect of gerund, to-infinitive and participial clause is very important. However, why are they seldom mentioned in many English Grammar books?

    Even the prize-winning Cambridge Grammar Guidebook does not mention it.

    I hope I also can contribute to this forum. In the meantime, I also learn from my mistakes.
    Thankful to you for your help.

    Thanks.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: still have a riddle....

    Quote Originally Posted by kl004535 View Post
    Thanks for your advice. If I am not mistaken, I think you are a linguist based on your previous postings. Linguist is my dream. I hope I could be a linguist one day.

    Could I ask you a question regarding the Gerund?
    Since the gerunds are derived from verbs, so it also has perfect and continuous sense of verbs in the Gerund. (not many other languages have this feature)
    Therefore, do I have to care about the aspect of the gerund in my sentences?

    For example:

    1. Jane's being sexually assaulted has made quite an impact on her.
    (The gerund above suggests that Jane was sexually assaulted.)

    2. Jane's having been sexually assaulted made quite an impact on her.
    (The gerund above suggests that Jane had sexually been assaulted.)


    Actually, the aspect of gerund, to-infinitive and participial clause is very important. However, why are they seldom mentioned in many English Grammar books?

    Even the prize-winning Cambridge Grammar Guidebook does not mention it.

    I hope I also can contribute to this forum. In the meantime, I also learn from my mistakes.
    Thankful to you for your help.

    Thanks.
    I don't know much about aspect myself. Maybe I have the same grammar book.

  6. Junior Member
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    #6

    Re: still have a riddle....

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I don't know much about aspect myself. Maybe I have the same grammar book.
    I do not understand the meaning of your words. Are there any misunderstanding?
    Last edited by kl004535; 30-May-2010 at 05:33.

  7. fighting spirit's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: still have a riddle....

    I'm not sure I clearly understand your question, but I'll tell you what I think.

    2. Jane's having been sexually assaulted made quite an impact on her.
    (The gerund above suggests that Jane had sexually been assaulted.)
    Having does not function as gerund. According to the following form of the verb TO BE, which is BEEN (having been), we can see that it is the perfect infinitive. That's why it;s not mentioned in English grammar Books. It isn't gerund, obviously.

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