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    • Join Date: May 2010
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    #1

    "He will have gone" or "He will has gone"?

    "He will have gone" or "He will has gone"?
    which one is correct?

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    #2

    Exclamation Re: "He will have gone" or "He will has gone"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Persian Girl View Post
    "He will have gone" or "He will has gone"?
    which one is correct?
    Skp

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "He will have gone" or "He will has gone"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Persian Girl View Post
    "He will have gone" or "He will has gone"?
    which one is correct?
    After 'will', as after the modal verbs and auxiliary verbs, you need to use the unconjugated bare infinitive. Therefore, 'have'.

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    #4

    Re: "He will have gone" or "He will has gone"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    After 'will', as after the modal verbs and auxiliary verbs, you need to use the unconjugated bare infinitive. Therefore, 'have'.
    Hi, Raymott.
    Could you please elucidate unconjugated bare infinitives

    thanks.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "He will have gone" or "He will has gone"?

    When you have a verb, it's To X.

    To be, to see, to hear, to open, to find, to have, etc.

    The bare infinitive is the part without the "to."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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