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  1. Mad-ox's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile TO BE

    Which is the negative-interrogative contracted form of the verb TO BE in the first person singular? Is it Amn't I? it seems to me a little bit weird.

    Contracted forms


    ?????????????????????
    Arenít you?
    Isnít he?
    Isnít she?
    Isnít it?
    Arenít we?
    Arenít you?
    Arenít they?

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: TO BE

    As strange as it may seem, it's "aren't I"?

    (You can say "Am I not?" but outside of certain regions, "amn't" -- although logical -- is not used.)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #3

    Re: TO BE

    Quote Originally Posted by Mad-ox View Post
    Which is the negative-interrogative contracted form of the verb TO BE in the first person singular? Is it Amn't I? it seems to me a little bit weird.

    Contracted forms


    ?????????????????????
    Arenít you?
    Isnít he?
    Isnít she?
    Isnít it?
    Arenít we?
    Arenít you?
    Arenít they?
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Good afternoon, Mad-ox.

    (1) I am sure that you already know this, but just in case that you do

    not, may I respectfully call your attention to > ain't.

    (2) This is considered uneducated speech. If a person uses this,

    many other people will not respect that person's English.

    (3) Of course, I have no proof, but I think that if a politician used this

    word in most parts of the United States, s/he would not get elected.

    (Although some politicians might say it on purpose to show that s/he is

    one of the common people.)

    (4) AIN'T:

    I'm your best friend, ain't I?

    He is your friend, ain't he?

    We are going to the movies, ain't we?

    (5) "Educated" people occasionally use it to be humorous: Ain't that the

    truth!

    Have a nice day!

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