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    • Join Date: Oct 2008
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    #1

    Have and have got

    Hi teachers,
    How are you doing?
    I have a question...

    I'd like to know if this sentece is ok:

    >> I haven't any money (It's really weird!!) I've never heard that!!
    This means: I don't have any money. (or) I haven't got any money.

    >> Have you any money? (Weird!!) I've never heard that either!!!
    This means: Do you have any money? (or) Have you got any money?


    Could you please tell if these senteces are ok?????

    I really appreciate it!!!

    Ademilson

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    #2

    Exclamation Re: Have and have got

    Quote Originally Posted by AdeExpress View Post
    Hi teachers,
    How are you doing?
    I have a question...

    I'd like to know if this sentece is ok:

    >> I haven't any money (It's really weird!!) I've never heard that!!
    This means: I don't have any money. (or) I haven't got any money.

    >> Have you any money? (Weird!!) I've never heard that either!!!
    This means: Do you have any money? (or) Have you got any money?


    Could you please tell if these senteces are ok?????

    I really appreciate it!!!

    Ademilson
    Both'Have' and 'Have got' are used for possession.
    So “She has $1,000 in the bank” or “He has got two beautiful daughters”. are correct because both are positive statements . But for negative/questions, use ‘do’ as the helping verb. with ‘have’ as the main verb; and ‘have’ as helping verb with an action/main verb ‘got’, as you have done.
    I don't have any money. Or I haven't got any money.
    Do you have any money? (or) Have you got any money?



    • Join Date: Oct 2008
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    #3

    Re: Have and have got

    Quote Originally Posted by sarat_106 View Post
    Both'Have' and 'Have got' are used for possession.
    So “She has $1,000 in the bank” or “He has got two beautiful daughters”. are correct because both are positive statements . But for negative/questions, use ‘do’ as the helping verb. with ‘have’ as the main verb; and ‘have’ as helping verb with an action/main verb ‘got’, as you have done.
    I don't have any money. Or I haven't got any money.
    Do you have any money? (or) Have you got any money?
    Hi Sarat,
    I really appreciate your help but you haven't answered my question.

  1. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Have and have got

    **Neither a teacher nor a native speaker.**

    Since both "I haven't any money." and "Have you any money?" are not correct English, I would not focus on their actual meanings.
    I don't think you can know if someone wants to say:
    "Do you have any money?" or "Have you got any money?" when he says
    "Have you any money?"
    Theoretically, he could mean either.

    P.S. "Have you gotten any money?" would be the American version, which should be interesting for Brazil...

    Cheers!

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    #5

    Re: Have and have got

    Hi Nightmare85,

    Could you please explain what you mean by "not correct English" ?

    Cheers

  2. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Have and have got

    Sure.

    For positive sentences we don't need a helping verb (do.)
    I have some money.

    For negative sentences we need a helping verb.
    I don't have any money.

    For questions we need a helping verb.
    Do I have any money?

    Of course everyone will understand the sense if you don't use a helping verb:
    I have not any money.
    Have I any money?

    However, this is not correct.
    (Although some teachers say: "Has he friends?" is correct, but I disagree.)

    If you don't use Simple Present, you don't need a "do":
    I have not gotten any money.
    Have I gotten any money?

    This is correct, but not the same as the previous example sentences.

    Cheers!

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    #7

    Re: Have and have got

    hi again

    Is then a sentence "has she got any many ?" - present simple or present perfect ?

    Cheers

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    #8

    Re: Have and have got

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    Since both "I haven't any money." and "Have you any money?" are not correct English,
    That is not true. Both uses of 'have' above are perfectly grammatical. 'Do', 'have', and 'be' are primary verbs. It means they have functions both as an auxiliary and as a main verb. In stative senses, 'have' is used (generally in rather formal style) as an operator, especially in BrE. There is also the informal have got construction as an alternative to stative 'have'.

    I haven't any money. -- BrE formal
    Have you any money? -- BrE formal
    I do not have any money. -- AmE, getting frequent in BrE now
    Do you have any money? -- AmE, getting frequent in BrE now
    I haven't got any money. -- BrE informal
    HAve you got any money? -- BrE informal

    In dynamic senses, unlike in 'have money', 'have' normally has do support, and have got is not used.

    Does she have coffee with her breakfast? Yes she does.
    Has she got coffee with her breakfast?
    Has she coffee with her breakfast?


    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    I would not focus on their actual meanings.
    I don't think you can know if someone wants to say:
    "Do you have any money?" or "Have you got any money?" when he says
    "Have you any money?"
    Theoretically, he could mean either.

    P.S. "Have you gotten any money?" would be the American version, which should be interesting for Brazil...

    Cheers!

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    #9

    Re: Have and have got

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    (Although some teachers say: "Has he friends?" is correct, but I disagree.)

    Disagree? What is the basis of your discord? Did you carry out some corpus-based research recently? Or are you a theoretical linguist?

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    #10

    Re: Have and have got

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaskin View Post
    hi again

    Is then a sentence "has she got any many ?" - present simple or present perfect ?

    Cheers
    I translate your question into more obvious language. Is 'have' in 'have got' a perfective auxiliary verb that helps the main verb 'got', or is 'have got' a verb idiom, an idiomatic unit?

    Let us see what implications the first assumption has. If 'have' is an auxiliary verb, it means 'got' is the main verb, which, in its turn, means we have a present perfect. "Is it correct?", rightfully arises the question. If we have a present perfect, we also have a simple present:

    I get money.
    I have got money.

    The two get's do not match semantically. I would say 'have got' is an idiom and 'has got' is simple present tense.

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