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    #1

    draw on = approach

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentences?

    During the whole of a dull, dark, and soundless day in the autumn of the year, when the clouds hung oppressively low in the heavens, I had been passing alone, on horseback, through a singularly dreary tract of country ; and at length found myself, as the shades of the evening drew on, within view of the melancholy House of Usher.

    Autumn is drawing on.

    draw on = approach, as in As evening draws on, we'll make our way back to the house.

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 04-Jun-2010 at 09:24.

  1. Huda-M's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: draw on = approach

    Yes, Draw On does mean to approach, come closer or reach forward.

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    #3

    Re: draw on = approach

    hi,
    Please note I'm not a teacher nor a native speaker,

    Quote Originally Posted by Huda-M View Post
    Yes, Draw On does mean to approach, come closer or reach forward.
    if Autumn approaches it is Summer.
    if Autumn is drawing on it is Autumn.

    if a period of time is drawing on it's getting close to its end.

    Cheers

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: draw on = approach

    It's not a phrase I use often, but I don't think I use it to me "approach" but "progresses."

    As the evening drew on = As the evening progressed. Maybe that is the same as approaches the END (but not the start).
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: draw on = approach

    Thank you all for your kindness.

    maybe draw on = cross, go across, top = decline = wear away

    as in: The night was half over.

    draw on = go, leak, flow = pass as in:

    As the day drew on, the shelling eased off a bit. = Later in the afternoon shelling fell slightly.

    Regards,

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 04-Jun-2010 at 15:47.

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