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    #1

    comparative degree

    Dear teachers,

    This is a sentence in my textbook:
    My car consumes more gas than hers.
    I think this sentence can be rewritten the following way:
    My car consumes more gas than her car consumes.
    Does this mean in comparative sentences “be” and “do” can always be omitted?
    For example:
    He is a far better dentist than you (are).
    I don’t like smoking any more than you (do).

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: comparative degree

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Dear teachers,

    This is a sentence in my textbook:
    My car consumes more gas than hers.
    I think this sentence can be rewritten the following way:
    My car consumes more gas than her car consumes.
    Does this mean in comparative sentences “be” and “do” can always be omitted?
    For example:
    He is a far better dentist than you (are).
    I don’t like smoking any more than you (do).

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    The simple answer is "Yes they can [be]".

    The long answer is more complicated.
    First, there is the complication that sometimes the meaning is lost.
    "I like her more than you" can mean:
    "I like her more than you do" or
    "I like her more than I like you".
    (Note that 'you' is both subjective and objective case - nominative and accusative.

    Second, there is sometimes disagreement about the correct pronoun to use, where the accusative "him, me, etc." is often used in place of the nominative:
    "I like her more than him" can actually mean:
    "I like her more than I like him" and
    "I like her more than he does".
    This use of pronouns has been discussed extensively on other threads - especially under "I vs me"

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