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    #1

    Use of the word "training"

    I am an English speaker and when I hear the sentence:
    "She has a training on Saturday"
    It just doesn't sound correct, seems like training is left undefined and the meaning of the sentence is totally unclear - yet I am told the sentence follows all English rules and is perfectly fine.

    I would have said "She has a training class on Saturday" or Training Session, or "She has training on Saturday" or "She is being trained on Saturday" would make far better sense.

    Please could somebody knowledgeable in the English rules explain why the use of "a training" in the context it is being used is correct or incorrect

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Use of the word "training"

    Hi and welcome to Using English.

    I would use it just as you did. I would not say "a training" without "class" or your other suggestions, but I would say "she has training."

    I can't explain why "a training" would be used by others, except perhaps it's common in other dialects of English.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #3

    Re: Use of the word "training"

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Hi and welcome to Using English.

    I would use it just as you did. I would not say "a training" without "class" or your other suggestions, but I would say "she has training."

    I can't explain why "a training" would be used by others, except perhaps it's common in other dialects of English.
    I'm with Barb on this. As far as I'm concerned we wouldn't simply say "a training" in BrE either.

    As you suggested, a training session, a training course, a training event, or just training.


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    #4

    Re: Use of the word "training"

    Thank you Barb and Ems for your swift responses and confirmation that I am not going crazy.

    I was looking for a technical reason why it was not correct, is there a way to explain the technicalities for it being wrong to say "a training" or is it just one of those unexplainable things that you just learn from experience?

    I have to confess English was never my thing at school and such, things such as verbs, nouns and all the other descriptors that make up our language and their rules totally were meaningless to me - I simply know what is right and wrong, but the rules are beyond reason to me!!!

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Use of the word "training"

    Okay, how's this:
    Training is either a non-count noun (she has training, without the article), or an adjective (a training session). It isn't used as a countable noun.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #6

    Re: Use of the word "training"

    Thanks Barb for the explanation!

    I have another question regarding training, so I thought I could post it here.

    Do we say:

    I take training (or) I give training.

    I was corrected by someone at work saying:

    I take training: (I am being trained by someone)

    I give training: (I am the trainer who train others)

    Please advise.

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    #7

    Re: Use of the word "training"

    Quote Originally Posted by 2010 View Post
    Thanks Barb for the explanation!

    I have another question regarding training, so I thought I could post it here.

    Do we say:

    I take training (or) I give training.

    I was corrected by someone at work saying:

    I take training: (I am being trained by someone) Correct.

    I give training: (I am the trainer who train others) Correct.

    Please advise.
    You can say both, and you have the meanings correct. The only change I would make is that we say "I receive training" more often than "I take training".

    There is also an argument for saying that "I take training" can also mean that you are the teacher.

    I believe that, in AmE, if I said "I am taking a class in history", it means I am a student.

    In BrE, if I say "I am taking a class in history" it can mean that I will be the student or the teacher!

    My aunt used to be a drama teacher and she would say "I take the students for drama" meaning that she gave them drama classes.

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    #8

    Re: Use of the word "training"

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    You can say both, and you have the meanings correct. The only change I would make is that we say "I receive training" more often than "I take training".

    There is also an argument for saying that "I take training" can also mean that you are the teacher.

    I believe that, in AmE, if I said "I am taking a class in history", it means I am a student.

    In BrE, if I say "I am taking a class in history" it can mean that I will be the student or the teacher!

    My aunt used to be a drama teacher and she would say "I take the students for drama" meaning that she gave them drama classes.
    Thanks for your reply!

    What I understand is: I can either say "I take training" or "I give training" (If I am the trainer)

    "I take training" or "I receive training" (If I am the trainee)

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    #9

    Re: Use of the word "training"

    Quote Originally Posted by 2010 View Post
    Thanks for your reply!

    What I understand is: I can either say "I take training" or "I give training" (If I am the trainer)

    "I take training" or "I receive training" (If I am the trainee)
    To avoid ambiguity, personally I would stick with "I receive/get training" as the trainee and "I give training" as the trainer.

    If there are different interpretations of "I take training" depending on who you're talking to, you can probably guarantee that the person will take the opposite interpretation of the one you meant!

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    #10

    Re: Use of the word "training"

    Indeed. I guarantee that if you told me that you took training, it would never occur to me that you were the teacher.

    I would be unlikely to say it that way, though.

    I took a training course in that, or I had some training in that, or I was trained in that.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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