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  1. #1
    THREEGTWOG is offline Banned
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    snoring

    1) Have you found any cure for your snoring
    2) Whwn do we say "out of pocket" and "I am broke" do both mean that I don't have money

  2. #2
    Jay Louise's Avatar
    Jay Louise is offline Junior Member
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    Re: snoring

    Quote Originally Posted by THREEGTWOG View Post
    1) Have you found any cure for your snoring
    2) Whwn do we say "out of pocket" and "I am broke" do both mean that I don't have money
    ** not a teacher **

    1) Have you found any cure for your snoring?

    Sadly, I have not. Personally, I would use "a cure" in place of "any cure". I know "any" can be used with both plural and singular nouns, but I don't know exactly the rule for this example. All I can say is that it just sounds a bit off to my ear.

    2) Whwn do we say "out of pocket" and "I am broke" do both mean that I don't have money

    NO. I am broke = I don't have money.

    Out-of-pocket expenses are ones that you pay for yourself (out of your own pocket) as compared to ones that your employer (or someone else) pays on your behalf. For example, I will be moving soon and my employer is paying for most of the costs. Anything I pay for myself that isn't reimbursed by the company would be considered my out-of-pocket expenses.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Re: snoring

    <<Ad removed>>

    2. For informal language, I guess you can use both to refer to having no money.

    According to dictionary.com:

    out-of-pocket = without funds or assets.
    broke = without money; penniless.
    Last edited by Barb_D; 10-Aug-2010 at 18:53.

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: snoring

    In British English too, I have only heard 'out of pocket' used to mean that you have had to spend money and won't get reimbursed, or are somehow the loser in a financial transaction- you've lost money, but there's no implication that you are out of money.

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