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  1. #1
    Kacenkaa is offline Newbie
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    that clause after seem

    Hello
    Please, will you be so kind and hlep me with this sentence?
    It seems, that whether you are my friend, she is just a girl next door.
    It doesnīt make much sense, but I just wanted to know the function of the "that clause" here. Am I right, that this is a nominal clause, functioning as a subject complement (nominal predicate), or is it a direct object of seem? "Seem" is a copular word, isnīt it? So it shouldnīt have a direct object, right?
    Thank you so much for your replies, Kate

  2. #2
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Re: that clause after seem

    Quote Originally Posted by Kacenkaa View Post
    Hello
    Please, will you be so kind and hlep me with this sentence?
    It seems that, whether you are my friend, she is just a girl next door.
    Note, the comma comes after "that", not after "seems".
    The sentence doesn't make sense, as you say Perhaps it should be:
    "It seems that, whereas you are my friend, she is just a girl next door."

    It doesnīt make much sense, but I just wanted to know the function of the "that clause" here.
    The that clause is "that she is just a girl next door". The function of that clause is to state that she is not a friend - as the person being spoken to is (or seems to be).


    I can't find a function for the main clause though, "It seems". The speaker should know whether it's true or not.
    Omitting "it seems", you get "She is just a girl next door, whereas you are my friend."

    Am I right, that this is a nominal clause, functioning as a subject complement (nominal predicate), or is it a direct object of seem? "Seem" is a copular word, isnīt it? So it shouldnīt have a direct object, right?
    Thank you so much for your replies, Kate
    Sorry, I'm really not up to date on nominal predicates and subject compliments etc. You want to know the type of the clause in bold:
    It seems that she is just a girl next door.

    Someone else help please!

  3. #3
    Kacenkaa is offline Newbie
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    Re: that clause after seem

    Thank you very much for your reply.
    Of course, you are right, I made a mistake in a conjunction, it should have been "whereas". The sentence was different originally, but I couldnīt remember it, so I made up a different one, because I was interested just in a function of the that clause and I though that for this task, the exact sentence was not necessary. So Iīm sorry for such a stupid sentence and I really appreciate your help. Nevertheless I would be really glad if someone could explain the "that clause function" thing, that we both donīt know. Thank you very much

  4. #4
    TheParser is offline VIP Member
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    Re: that clause after seem

    Quote Originally Posted by Kacenkaa View Post
    Hello
    Please, will you be so kind and hlep me with this sentence?
    It seems, that whether you are my friend, she is just a girl next door.
    It doesnīt make much sense, but I just wanted to know the function of the "that clause" here. Am I right, that this is a nominal clause, functioning as a subject complement (nominal predicate), or is it a direct object of seem? "Seem" is a copular word, isnīt it? So it shouldnīt have a direct object, right?
    Thank you so much for your replies, Kate
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello, Kate.

    (1) You are correct: a linking verb (such as "seems") does NOT take

    an object.

    (2) You are using a sentence introduced by "it."

    (a) For example:

    It is obvious that English is important.

    (i) I think that we can say the noun clause ("English is important" is in

    apposition with "it." That is, it explains what "it" means.

    (a) It (that English is important) is obvious.

    OR

    That English is important is obvious.

    (3) Your sentence is "It seems that she is just the girl next door."

    That is:

    It (that she is just the girl next door) seems ____.

    Seems what? the sentence is not complete.

    Maybe you would like to submit a similar sentence, and then many

    people would be happy to help you analyze it.

    ***** Thank you *****

  5. #5
    2006 is offline Banned
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    Re: that clause after seem

    Quote Originally Posted by Kacenkaa View Post
    Hello
    Raymott is correct; the sentence should be 'It seems that, whereas you are my friend, she is just a girl next door.'
    So the clause you are asking about is "that she is just a girl next door".

    Am I right, that this is a nominal clause, functioning as a subject complement (nominal predicate) Yes, it seems that is correct, although I also am not an expert on such things.

    One doubt I have is that perhaps the "whereas" clause is also part of the subject complement. But I don't think it is, because the "whereas" clause doesn't seem to relate to "seems".
    Subject complement - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    2006

  6. #6
    Kacenkaa is offline Newbie
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    Re: that clause after seem

    OK, so I think I already get it. So the whole clause beginning with "whereas" is a subject complement of the clause with "seems". At the same time, this clause is dependent on the clause beginning with "she". It is an adverbial clause of concession. And together, these two clauses are subject complement of the first clause.
    Thank you all very much for the replies and for your help. I really appreciate it.

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