Results 1 to 5 of 5
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Vietnamese
      • Home Country:
      • Vietnam
      • Current Location:
      • Vietnam

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 109
    #1

    due to

    Hi there,

    Is it correct to say this?

    'Due to some reasons..., ...

    Tks
    simon


    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 7
    #2

    Re: due to

    Yes, it is correct. " due to" is the same meaning with " because of" and " owing to"

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,883
    #3

    Re: due to

    Quote Originally Posted by simon1234 View Post
    Hi there,

    Is it correct to say this?

    'Due to some reasons..., ...

    Tks
    simon
    You can, but it's very vague. If I received a letter saying "Due to some reasons, we cannot pay you your salary this month" (for example!), I would not be very happy.

    It would be better worded:

    Due to the lack of money in our bank, we can't pay you.
    Due to a problem with the electronic transfer system, we can't pay you.
    Due to various unforeseen problems, we can't pay you.

    With your original sentence, the problem is not with "Due to", it's with "some"!

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #4

    Re: due to

    Quote Originally Posted by simon1234 View Post
    Hi there,

    Is it correct to say this?

    'Due to some reasons..., ...

    Tks
    simon
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello, Simon.

    (1) It is true that nowadays, most people often use "due to" and "because

    of" interchangeably as prepositions.

    (2) I was taught, however, that if you wish to be 100% "correct," you

    should use "due" as an adjective.

    (3) I arrived late because of/due to car troubles.

    (a) I think most native speakers (and test graders) would accept either

    answer nowadays.

    (4) But to use "due" as an adjective (which a few people still do), you

    need a longer and more difficult sentence such as:

    My late arrival was DUE (adjective) to car troubles (prepositional

    phrase modifying the adjective "due.")

    ***** Thank you *****

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: May 2010
    • Posts: 577
    #5

    Re: due to

    Since here, 'reason' means cause, you cannot say 'due to some reasons' because 'due to' already has the sense of cause - it would be like saying 'for reasons of some reasons'. However, you can say:

    'due to [state the reason]' eg 'due to the bad weather, the game was cancelled'

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] Due to OR Because of ?
    By hehe in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 29-Jan-2009, 13:12
  2. Due to
    By daddyjohn in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 15-Nov-2008, 20:43
  3. due in?
    By enydia in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 22-Oct-2008, 12:46
  4. had got their due
    By user_gary in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 27-Mar-2007, 11:20
  5. due to
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 25-May-2004, 10:14

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •