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  1. #1
    Allen165 is offline Key Member
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    For/against

    "Why the hate for/against George Bush?"

    Are both "for" and "against" correct? I think they are.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: For/against

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    "Why the hate for/against George Bush?"

    Are both "for" and "against" correct? I think they are.

    Thanks.
    "Hate" is not really a noun. It's a verb. The noun is "hatred" although "hate" is increasingly being used as a noun.

    You don't "hate for" someone. But you don't "hate against" someone either! You just "hate" someone.

    However, you do "have hatred for" someone.

    So to me "Why the hatred for George Bush?" would be correct.

  3. #3
    Allen165 is offline Key Member
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    Re: For/against

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    "Hate" is not really a noun. It's a verb. The noun is "hatred" although "hate" is increasingly being used as a noun.

    You don't "hate for" someone. But you don't "hate against" someone either! You just "hate" someone.

    However, you do "have hatred for" someone.

    So to me "Why the hatred for George Bush?" would be correct.
    I think it's acceptable to use "hate" as a noun, especially in informal contexts. But if you're going to use "hatred," the preposition that should follow it is, I think, "of."

    See The Grammarphobia Blog Blog Archive What do you call a man-hater?

  4. #4
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    philadelphia is offline Senior Member
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    Re: For/against

    It would seem we could also use hatred of too. Eg What is very clear in these letters is Clark's passionate hatred of his father.

    Not a teacher at all

  5. #5
    bertietheblue is offline Senior Member
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    Re: For/against

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    "Hate" is not really a noun. It's a verb. The noun is "hatred" although "hate" is increasingly being used as a noun.
    Hate is a noun - there's no 'not really' involved. I can't think of any difference in meaning to 'hatred' (the Oxford English Dictionary gives both as mass nouns meaning 'intense dislike') but would be interested if someone could tell me a difference.

    To add to the above, you can also say 'hatred towards' - 'I don't feel any hatred towards him anymore; I've learnt to accept him for what he is.'

  6. #6
    philadelphia's Avatar
    philadelphia is offline Senior Member
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    Re: For/against

    Quote Originally Posted by bertietheblue View Post
    To add to the above, you can also say 'hatred towards' - 'I don't feel any hatred towards him anymore; I've learnt to accept him for what he is.'
    I am not sure whether hatred towards and hatred to mean the same - any idea? Maybe in spoken English

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