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  1. #1
    Ferdie11's Avatar
    Ferdie11 is offline Member
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    I've led a fulfilling life and enjoy what I do everyday

    Hi,

    Is this grammatically correct?

    I've led a fulfilling life and enjoy what I do everyday.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    billmcd is offline Key Member
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    Re: I've led a fulfilling life and enjoy what I do everyday

    Sure.

  3. #3
    Ferdie11's Avatar
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    Re: I've led a fulfilling life and enjoy what I do everyday

    Quote Originally Posted by billmcd View Post
    Sure.
    Shouldn't it be "I've led a fulfilling life and enjoyed what I do everyday"?

  4. #4
    billmcd is offline Key Member
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    Re: I've led a fulfilling life and enjoy what I do everyday

    Quote Originally Posted by Ferdie11 View Post
    Shouldn't it be "I've led a fulfilling life and enjoyed what I do everyday"?
    No, simple present ("enjoy") is used primarily to describe something that occurs on a regular basis and in your case as you have stated "everyday". The only thing you might want to do is insert the pronoun "I" before enjoy.

  5. #5
    bertietheblue is offline Senior Member
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    Re: I've led a fulfilling life and enjoy what I do everyday

    Shouldn't that be 'every day'? Isn't 'everyday' only an adjective? It is in the Oxford English Dictionary.

  6. #6
    bertietheblue is offline Senior Member
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    Re: I've led a fulfilling life and enjoy what I do everyday

    Quote Originally Posted by Ferdie11 View Post
    Shouldn't it be "I've led a fulfilling life and enjoyed what I do everyday"?

    Another problem with this is non-agreement of tenses (the tenses should agree as you are enjoying at the same time as you are doing) in the second clause. You could say:

    I enjoy what I do every day [present + present]
    I've enjoyed what I've done with my life so far [present prefect + present perfect]

  7. #7
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Re: I've led a fulfilling life and enjoy what I do everyday

    Quote Originally Posted by bertietheblue View Post
    Shouldn't that be 'every day'? Isn't 'everyday' only an adjective? It is in the Oxford English Dictionary.
    You bet. A common mistake even among native speakers. Thank goodness Word notices now when "everyday" isn't before a noun and asks me if that is what I really meant. (And usually it isn't!)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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