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    #1

    Lightbulb the words ware and humbly

    Does the word "ware" have synonyms. Could you explain its meaning to me please?

    What does the word "humbly" mean in this sentence.
    I humbly vow to re-double my efforts.
    Thank you


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    #2

    Re: the words ware and humbly

    Ware came from ceramics (earthenware) and has come to mean products, articles, goods that are grouped in some way (normally by what they are made of).
    In computing this started with the groupings of software and hardware but has now spread to words like freeware, shareware etc meaning 'software that is..' free, to be shared etc
    My favourite is wetware, meaning the human brain!

    'Humbly' in the second sentence implies that the person feels bad and wants to vow in a humble way to show that their vow is in earnest.

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    #3

    Re: the words ware and humbly

    Quote Originally Posted by EnglishMuffin View Post

    'Humbly' in the second sentence implies that the person feels bad and wants to vow in a humble way to show that their vow is in earnest.
    I'd be more likely to think, in contemporary English, that the person was using 'humbly' knowingly and being flippant or jocular rather than earnest. I mean, who would 'humbly vow' to do something in earnest except perhaps politicians (the servants of the state)? Of course, in Dickens' time, the deprived masses were the humble servants of the landed classes and 'humbly' meant what it meant.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: the words ware and humbly

    Quote Originally Posted by EnglishMuffin View Post
    Ware came from ceramics (earthenware) and has come to mean products, articles, goods that are grouped in some way (normally by what they are made of).
    In computing this started with the groupings of software and hardware but has now spread to words like freeware, shareware etc meaning 'software that is..' free, to be shared etc
    My favourite is wetware, meaning the human brain!
    ...
    Another meaning of 'ware' that you may see in earlier texts is 'something offered for sale'. (The first example that comes to mind is in the nursery rhyme Simple Simon:

    Simple Simon
    Met a pie-man
    Going to the fair.
    Said Simple Simon
    To the pie-man
    Let me taste your wares
    )

    It's occasionally today used in a metaphorical sense - 'She was wearing a low-cut dress that displayed her wares' (this is not just a euphemism for what is being displayed, but also implies that the woman's intentions are commercial').

    Although the word is quite uncommon now, it is apparent in the composite word "warehouse".

    b

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    #5

    Re: the words ware and humbly

    Hello,

    I thought, the word "Humbly" means to do something in a modest way. (according to the dictionary)
    Am I right?
    Thanks.

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    #6

    To bertietheblue

    Dear bertietheblue,

    I am not spamming this forum. I had to ask about this word again because of its 4th definition.
    I am very grateful to this forum by the way.

    Please tell me what is meant under the word 'deep' in this sentence.
    They were speaking as emphatically as if they were uttering a series of deep aphorisms.
    Thank you.

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    #7

    Re: the words ware and humbly

    Quote Originally Posted by sondra View Post
    Hello,

    I thought, the word "Humbly" meanst* to** do something in a modest way. (according to the dictionary)
    Am I right?
    Thanks.
    Yes. There's no need for a comma. What makes your doubt your source?

    *Some people wouldn't make this correction. Because opinions differ (but not among examiners ) I'd rephrase it as 'Doesn't it mean ...? [That's what the dictionary says, and it's what I think.]'

    **Why the verb? 'Humbly is an adverb. It means*** 'in a modest way'.

    *** It often doesn't mean that - being used just for politeness: 'Might I humbly suggest... ?' The person saying that might not be humble at all.



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    #8

    Re: To bertietheblue

    Quote Originally Posted by sondra View Post
    Dear bertietheblue,

    I am not spamming this forum. I had to ask about this word again because of its 4th definition.
    I am very grateful to this forum by the way.

    Please tell me what is meant under the word 'deep' in this sentence.
    They were speaking as emphatically as if they were uttering a series of deep aphorisms.
    Thank you.
    Sondra, my spamming comment was addressed to Hungsake and not you! That's why I quoted him/her.

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    #9

    Re: To bertietheblue

    Quote Originally Posted by sondra View Post
    ...
    Please tell me what is meant under the word 'deep' in this sentence.
    They were speaking as emphatically as if they were uttering a series of deep aphorisms.
    Thank you.
    Weighty, meaningful, carrying a profoundly important message.

    PS - To start new discussions, please open a new thread.

    b

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