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  1. #1
    sh.hazeri is offline Junior Member
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    Question Fair Enough

    - When can we use "Fair enough" and why we do not say "OK" or "Allright" ... ?
    Last edited by sh.hazeri; 15-Jun-2010 at 18:19.

  2. #2
    euncu's Avatar
    euncu is offline Senior Member
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    Re: Fait Enough

    ***neither a teacher nor a native-speaker***

    It mostly means that you've found an explanation plausible.

  3. #3
    sh.hazeri is offline Junior Member
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    Re: Fait Enough

    From a native speaker point of view ?

  4. #4
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    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Re: Fair Enough

    Exactly as stated above by euncu.

    You might not like it or agree with it, but it's plausible.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. #5
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    Re: Fair Enough

    Quote Originally Posted by sh.hazeri View Post
    - When can we use "Fair enough" and why we do not say "OK" or "Allright" ... ?
    In addition to the definitions previously mentioned, "fair enough" can also be used to mean "fine; have it your way" (if you are trying to persuade somebody or show them a better way to get something done and they won't listen).

    On a slightly unrelated note, I've found that a lot of native speakers make this mistake: It's "all right", not "allright" and definitely not "alright". Same goes for "never mind" and "a lot" - all of them are made up of two words.

  6. #6
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Fair Enough

    Quote Originally Posted by Score_Under View Post
    In addition to the definitions previously mentioned, "fair enough" can also be used to mean "fine; have it your way" (if you are trying to persuade somebody or show them a better way to get something done and they won't listen).

    On a slightly unrelated note, I've found that a lot of native speakers make this mistake: It's "all right", not "allright" and definitely not "alright". Same goes for "never mind" and "a lot" - all of them are made up of two words.
    In Australia, "fair enough" is widely and commonly used to mean "OK, that's an acceptable explanation/plan/decision".

    As far as the objection to "alright", I don't agree, and nor do the following dictionaries:
    Definition of alright adjective/adverb/exclamation from Cambridge Dictionary Online: Free English Dictionary and Thesaurus
    Alright - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary
    Alright | Define Alright at Dictionary.com

    Specifically, see the usage note on the latter.

  7. #7
    bertietheblue is offline Senior Member
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    Re: Fair Enough

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    In Australia, "fair enough" is widely and commonly used to mean "OK, that's an acceptable explanation/plan/decision". In BrEng too.

    As far as the objection to "alright", I don't agree, and nor do the following dictionaries:
    Definition of alright adjective/adverb/exclamation from Cambridge Dictionary Online: Free English Dictionary and Thesaurus
    Alright - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary
    Alright | Define Alright at Dictionary.com

    nor the Oxford English Dictionary (1998 edn):

    "There is no logical reason for insisting on 'all right' as two words, when other single-word forms such as 'altogether' have long been accepted. Nevertheless, it is still considered by many people to be unacceptable in formal writing."

    I think, however, there is a preference for 'all right' in most BrEng style guides. Here's the Guardian:

    "'all right' is right, 'alright' is not all right (but note the Who song, much loved by generations of headline writers, was The Kids are Alright)"

    and the Times:

    "all right never alright".

    Specifically, see the usage note on the latter.
    Bertie

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