Results 1 to 2 of 2
  1. #1
    Happpy is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Urdu
      • Home Country:
      • Pakistan
      • Current Location:
      • Pakistan
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    12

    Blitz and Assault?

    Hello, All!

    What's the difference between Blitz and Assault?

    I need descriptive answer please.

    Regards,
    Last edited by Happpy; 16-Jun-2010 at 16:32. Reason: I submitted my post in "Grammer" due error. Actually it's a "vocabulary" question, but I couldn't change it.

  2. #2
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,916

    Re: Blitz and Assault?

    Quote Originally Posted by Happpy View Post
    Hello, All!

    What's the difference between Blitz and Assault?

    I need descriptive answer please.

    Regards,
    They're very different, but are often used to refer to the same thing. The German Blitzen means "lightning". Someone - possibly Hitler, but Wikipedia will tell you - came up with the idea of Blitzkrieg [=lightning-war]; I suppose it was the 1940s version of what came to be known later as 'Shock and Awe' - starting and waging a war with an astonishing (awesome, morale-sapping) display of power.

    The Blitzkrieg that hit London in the early '40s was commonly known in English as 'The Blitz'; when a Londoner says 'My house was bombed in the Blitz' - he is referring to a particular assault. As a result*, many speakers of English treat 'blitz' like a synonym of 'assault'.

    But 'blitz' doesn't just refer to war. An office manager may say 'This week I want everyone to do a blitz on the filing' - it just refers to any sudden, brief, and intense effort of any kind. (Also, it can be used as a verb: 'I'm blitzing the housework today; there's dust everywhere, and the sunlight really shows it.')

    * (I'm guessing here, but I don't believe the word 'blitz' existed in English - although closely-related words like 'blind' did - until a particular Blitzkrieg hit London.)

    b

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •